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The Good Girl PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: The Good Girl
Author: Mary Kubica
Publisher: Published July 29th 2014 by Harlequin MIRA
ISBN: 9780778316558
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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I've been following her for the past few days. I know where she buys her groceries, where she works. I don't know the color of her eyes or what they look like when she's scared. But I will. One night, Mia Dennett enters a bar to meet her on-again, off-again boyfriend. But when he doesn't show, she unwisely leaves with an enigmatic stranger. At first Colin Thatcher seems lik I've been following her for the past few days. I know where she buys her groceries, where she works. I don't know the color of her eyes or what they look like when she's scared. But I will. One night, Mia Dennett enters a bar to meet her on-again, off-again boyfriend. But when he doesn't show, she unwisely leaves with an enigmatic stranger. At first Colin Thatcher seems like a safe one-night stand. But following Colin home will turn out to be the worst mistake of Mia's life. When Colin decides to hide Mia in a secluded cabin in rural Minnesota instead of delivering her to his employers, Mia's mother, Eve, and detective Gabe Hoffman will stop at nothing to find them. But no one could have predicted the emotional entanglements that eventually cause this family's world to shatter.

30 review for The Good Girl

  1. 5 out of 5

    Emily May

    This book, like many others, is recommended for fans of Gone Girl, but I think if you gave it some different marketing and a younger protagonist, you could easily slot this in among the YA/NA romances. If this book hadn't been the only one I was carrying on a flight, I doubt I would have finished it. The sluggish pacing is more suited to quiet family dramas than thrillers, and yet the characters' lack of depth paired with trope after trope make it fail as a worthy contribution to that sub-genre This book, like many others, is recommended for fans of Gone Girl, but I think if you gave it some different marketing and a younger protagonist, you could easily slot this in among the YA/NA romances. If this book hadn't been the only one I was carrying on a flight, I doubt I would have finished it. The sluggish pacing is more suited to quiet family dramas than thrillers, and yet the characters' lack of depth paired with trope after trope make it fail as a worthy contribution to that sub-genre as well. Try A Spool of Blue Thread or Everything I Never Told You, if that's what you're looking for. Everything about this book is so obvious. I predicted the ending from the moment Mia is kidnapped (yes, another thriller about a missing rich woman) and - to be honest - started to guess it the moment the book was compared to Gone Girl. I also don't know if the Stockholm Syndrome was meant to be surprising, but that too was obvious almost immediately. I think The Good Girl needed stronger, more nuanced characters to carry its plot. Instead, we have the kidnapped daughter of a wealthy judge (who also happens to be the black sheep of the family), the aforementioned wealthy judge who is defined solely by his cruelty, the judge's unhappy trophy wife, and the detective who is such a cliche detective that it was hard not to imagine him with a funny hat and magnifying glass. On top of this, the story is so underwhelming and... boring. In this case, because of the changing perspectives, there is very little mystery behind the kidnapping. We know exactly what happened to Mia and, because of the changing "before" and "after" perspectives, we also know that she will be "rescued". The story is a long, detailed look at how a girl is kidnapped by a guy who is kind to her, looks after her, and tries to protect her. I was hardly hanging on the edge of my seat and wondering what would happen to her. I mean, I saw the Stockholm Syndrome coming from a mile away. No tension, no suspense, no mystery. Just a predictable "twist" flying in at the end. Also, I can't remember if anyone else has said anything about this, so it might just be me, but some of the emphasis placed on skin colour made me really uncomfortable. The author seems to go out of her way to point out when the white, privileged characters are minorities - usually to indicate that they are in a dangerous, shady place. What's up with all the "black" and "dark" characters being the bad guys? Too slow, too predictable and nothing new. Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Youtube | Pinterest

  2. 5 out of 5

    Hannah (Vamp of Savannah)

    I was promised a story like Gone Girl. What I got was Gone Girl's annoying little sister. Predictable and weak. Also, can anyone say Stockholm Syndrome?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kandee

    This is a debut?!!? WHAT? We need more authors like this out here. This book is not at all what it seems. I was expecting a book like Gone Girl and what I got was a relative of it. If you liked Gone Girl, you will like The Good Girl. It had me racing through the pages until the very end, WHICH BLEW...MY...MIND! It didn't really hit me what was going on until the last few pages. I had to reread a couple of pages to get it, but it was enjoyable, not annoying where I just didn't get it. I had an id This is a debut?!!? WHAT? We need more authors like this out here. This book is not at all what it seems. I was expecting a book like Gone Girl and what I got was a relative of it. If you liked Gone Girl, you will like The Good Girl. It had me racing through the pages until the very end, WHICH BLEW...MY...MIND! It didn't really hit me what was going on until the last few pages. I had to reread a couple of pages to get it, but it was enjoyable, not annoying where I just didn't get it. I had an idea of what was going on, but I had to be sure. This book really kept me guessing and each time, I was just very wrong. I really did like the multiple POV's of the novel, however. To some it may be confusing, but to me it was great! Refreshing, even. I haven't read a novel with multiple POV's that I have enjoyed in a long time. The author did a good job with hooking the reader in and having them crave for the end of every chapter, just so they could see what was going on in the next one. The characters were realistic to people I know and I was drawn into their lives and this again, was great. This is a fantastic book if you're craving a dark mystery. If you read this, you won't be disappointed because I was not and I am now looking forward to more books by Mary Kubica. She can write a hell of a story.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Larry H

    Dear publishing world, for the love of all that is holy, can we stop referring to any book with a scintilla of suspense in it as "the next Gone Girl"? Honestly, these books have very little in common (except for one or two unlikeable characters), so the comparison either sets up unfair expectations or might cause those who disliked the original book to pass this one by. And they shouldn't. Mia Dennett is the headstrong daughter of James, a powerful and ego-driven Chicago judge, and his English wi Dear publishing world, for the love of all that is holy, can we stop referring to any book with a scintilla of suspense in it as "the next Gone Girl"? Honestly, these books have very little in common (except for one or two unlikeable characters), so the comparison either sets up unfair expectations or might cause those who disliked the original book to pass this one by. And they shouldn't. Mia Dennett is the headstrong daughter of James, a powerful and ego-driven Chicago judge, and his English wife, Eve, who has been a victim of her husband's domineering nature for so long that she has become utterly malleable. One night Mia's boyfriend cancels their date at the last minute (a frequent occurrence), leaving her alone at the bar where they were to meet. She drinks a little too much, and finds herself flirting with Colin Thatcher, who provides just the right salve for her vulnerability that night. But when Mia decides to go home with Colin, she gets far more than just a one-night stand. Colin was actually paid to abduct her and deliver her to a notorious criminal, so he could hold her for ransom. However, something convinces Colin not to follow the original plan, and instead he takes Mia to a secluded cabin in Minnesota. The two go into hiding, hoping they can steer clear of law enforcement and those who originally paid Colin to abduct Mia. At first, their relationship is built on dominance and fear, as Colin must threaten Mia to get her to stay with him. But eventually, Mia realizes there is far more to Colin than meets the eye, that he is vulnerable and emotionally needy, and Colin realizes that Mia isn't the spoiled little rich girl he assumed she was when he was hired to abduct her. The Good Girl shifts perspective between Colin, Eve, and Gabe Hoffman, the police detective investigating Mia's disappearance, and it shifts from the events leading up to and through her abduction to the aftermath. Gabe is determined to find out what happened to Mia, despite constant resistance from her father, and Eve is wracked with guilt that she wasn't the mother she knew she could be, and is desperate for one more chance. This is one of those books that makes you suspect everyone isn't what they seem to be. Even though some of the plot points seem to be fairly obvious (at least to me), I definitely wondered how Mary Kubica was going to tie everything up—or even if she was going to. I definitely thought Kubica tried to hard to make James, and to some extent, Eve, fairly unlikeable characters (although in different ways), but I found Mia and Colin's characters tremendously interesting. I almost wish the book could have focused on them the entire time. I enjoyed this book and found myself pretty hooked, even as I hoped that Kubica wouldn't take the plot in a certain direction. She's a very skilled writer, and this is definitely worth a read if you like suspense/crime novels.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ash Wednesday

    The cover and title typography says “I’m smart and edgy! See that reverse ‘R’? It probably means something related to why the blonde chick wants you to keep quiet. Don’t you want to know why?” And you know I’m all over the smart and edgy with the hint of smart, edgy mindfuck. The blurb says “An addictively suspenseful and tautly written thriller” among other things and who cares if my computer is telling me ‘addictively’ isn’t a word? Fuck you, New Oxford American Dictionary! A rich, pretty girl The cover and title typography says “I’m smart and edgy! See that reverse ‘R’? It probably means something related to why the blonde chick wants you to keep quiet. Don’t you want to know why?” And you know I’m all over the smart and edgy with the hint of smart, edgy mindfuck. The blurb says “An addictively suspenseful and tautly written thriller” among other things and who cares if my computer is telling me ‘addictively’ isn’t a word? Fuck you, New Oxford American Dictionary! A rich, pretty girl gets abducted by a stalker into a cabin in Winterfell, Minnesota to extort money from her rich daddy judge! I gave 5-fucking-stars to The Dark Duet! I am so going to enjoy the Stockholm out of this motherclucker! You don’t know me! This reader says... 1.5 STARS I tried to live the right way. I tried to follow the rules, but life just didn’t work out that way. To be honest, the suspense-thriller genre is a Catch-22 territory for me because if the build-up gets too winded, I get impatient; if the mystery is too transparent to figure out, I get pissed off and if the plot-twist intended to blow my mind in the end gets too contrived, I feel cheated. But I still delve into this hopeless adventure because the guesswork is always fun and the characters are, by extension, satisfyingly complex and intriguing. Based on my kindle app, The Good Girl 340-pages of 3 cliched and monochromatic characters trying to relay the soporific story of Mia Dennett’s abduction with the enthusiasm of a seven year-old hiding a secret I’m not so sure I’m interested to know about. It was like playing a guessing game with someone who keeps on slyly tempting you by building a bland mystery, but they're paying for lunch and so you have to ask them questions and feign interest the rest of the meal. The story was told from the alternating POVs of Mia Denett’s spineless trophy mom (Eve), the detective assigned to her case (Gabe Hoffman) and her abductor (Colin Thatcher) in varying temporal continuity. Which of course is one source of confusion, since the story shifts and slides with these perspectives i.e. during her abduction thru Colin/Owen; during the search for her thru Gabe; and after she’s been rescued when she only answers to the name of Chloe thru Eve. In the aftermath, she has experienced selective amnesia and you, her family and the detective are trying to piece together what really happened in that cabin. I rarely complain about a book outside the story and its merits but the galley I read had no chapters with no marker or warning when the POV shifts. I sincerely hope that it’s an uncorrected proof issue rather than a creative writing choice but it really gave me a tough time keeping pace with the rhythm this story intended to set. One moment I’m reading through Colin/Owen’s perspective and without even as much as a paragraph break, the POV shifts to someone else’s. I guess one can imagine how much this would test one's patience, especially with a story lacking the claws to dig deep enough for the reading experience to be seamless and intuitive. Something has happened to my daughter. Something bad. It screams at me, awakens me in the middle of the night: something has happened to Mia. I tell her we’re going outside. It’s the first time I let her out of the cabin. That’s EXACTLY how that scene appeared in my reader. So I’d often find myself reading a paragraph back just to recalibrate EVERYTHING in my mind: emotional attachment, perspective, character voice etc. And to make matters worse, I found each of the characters in this book extremely annoying with so much whining and complaining going on. Everyone seems to hate their fathers and finds something to whine about in a way that was meant to earn my sympathy but gained my ire instead. It was an endless circle of hate: Mia whines about being rich and neglected; Colin hates being poor and how caring for his sick, loving mother pushed him to be a criminal; Eve hates herself for being a weak mother and a pathetic wife; and Gabe Hoffman was just an all around dickwad with, surprise, a hidden heart of gold. The vilification of Mia's father was ridiculously over-simplified without context or depth: He's bad because he's rich and came from a family of lawyers. Much like how certain characters appear to be racially profiled: the cold and distant Russian OB-Gyne, the Somali mobster... ...which ofcourse would not have been something that niggled at me had it not been an item in a growing list of frustration points that includes pandering to my sympathies with Colin's (view spoiler)[mother suffering from Parkinson's (hide spoiler)] , the distracting and pointless sexual tension between the mom and the detective and the poorly hashed development of the relationship between Mia/Chloe and Colin/Owen. I am perfectly amenable to emotional manipulation, I just didn't like the cheap execution this resorted to. Much less that plot-twist at the end that I was dreading because it made very little sense to me, even if I figured it ahead (view spoiler)[Because if Mia truly believes that her father doesn't care for her, then why would she have herself kidnapped to blackmail him for ransom? Shouldn't she expect him to NOT pay up because it's her? (hide spoiler)] . Or maybe it was because my alienation from this heroine, of getting to know her through the perspective of others that made that last section (which was 10 or so pages from Mia's POV) a point of hostility for me. Doesn't matter, the plot-twist which I guess this book is banking on to salvage this soporific exercise, was a massive fail. I suppose I should appreciate the character growth in Eve and Colin's whining and their frustrations ring with some social commentary. There was some entertainment to be derived from the survivalist moments in the cabin, as watching two people suffer and freeze to death for reasons only known to one of them tend to be. She gets her period and we learn the literal interpretation for being 'on the rag'. I see the blood in a garbage bag and ask, 'What the fuck is this?' I'm sorry I ask. We collect our garbage in some white plastic bags that got left behind. From time to time we drive and drop them off in a Dumpster behind some lodge, late at night when we're certain no one will see. She asks why we don't just leave them outside. I ask if she wants to be eaten by a fucking bear. All my gripes and grumbles, were easily soothed by some obscure Anchorman reference. Even if it only made the lack of bear-related violence in this story more painfully obvious. Because seriously, gold mine of a plot twist missed right there. Review Copy courtesy of the publishers.

  6. 5 out of 5

    MollyK

    **** GoodReads Giveaway Winner *** The publishers of this book will tell you that The Good Girl is the next Gone Girl. It is not, don’t even bother. There are no fantastic plot twists because you pretty much know from the beginning what is going to happen. The clues are not so much cleverly placed as leadenly bombard the reader. This is not an intelligent read but an attack on the reader’s intelligence. The author relies on lazy literary and cultural stereotypes. In fact, this book was filled wit **** GoodReads Giveaway Winner *** The publishers of this book will tell you that The Good Girl is the next Gone Girl. It is not, don’t even bother. There are no fantastic plot twists because you pretty much know from the beginning what is going to happen. The clues are not so much cleverly placed as leadenly bombard the reader. This is not an intelligent read but an attack on the reader’s intelligence. The author relies on lazy literary and cultural stereotypes. In fact, this book was filled with subtle and overt racism. The author lets us know that only missing beautiful blonds are important enough for an investigator to devote his time too. If the population of an “ethnic” area is nearly half white then its “safe to walk around at night.” If an area is “largely African American” then it a “hellhole.” She even characterizes her white criminal as misunderstood with a wounded heart underneath. The African American is a crazy predator, like an animal. (No she didn’t call him a monkey she likens him to a killer whale. All black and shiny with scary white teeth!) WFT. Its 2014 are there no minorities working at Harlequin or even an educated socially aware white person???? Or was the idea that this poor imitation of Gone Girl could garner some of the monetary success enough to turn a blinds eye? Disgusting.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Paul Dinger

    I am ashamed to admit that I did read the whole thing. My crap meter went off early on, and I wish I could say it was wrong, but it wasn't. I got taken in by the pretty package, and a good review I am sure I read somewhere. Well, this is bad writing all over. Terrible motivations, has attraction replaced he's / she's crazy as the stupid motivator in movies? Supposed criminal choses not to kidnap woman for evil mastermind because, he's in love. Oh please! The moment things do began to be interest I am ashamed to admit that I did read the whole thing. My crap meter went off early on, and I wish I could say it was wrong, but it wasn't. I got taken in by the pretty package, and a good review I am sure I read somewhere. Well, this is bad writing all over. Terrible motivations, has attraction replaced he's / she's crazy as the stupid motivator in movies? Supposed criminal choses not to kidnap woman for evil mastermind because, he's in love. Oh please! The moment things do began to be interesting, it keep steering off into cliche central. And let's not talk about the horrible ending where in order to come up with a 'surprise ending' you would have to forget everything you know. I think this author has talent, she can come up with making this steamy pile of nonsense interesting at times which is quite an accomplishment, but she can't save it from the weight of a lot of bad ideas. In trying to be like Gone Girl, this one is simply gone.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Diane S ☔

    Wow, I just finished this and am completely bowled over about this being a debut novel. Talk about non-stop suspense. Told from three different perspective, during the kidnapping, after the kidnapping when they are trying to piece together what happened and from the detective while he is hunting for the kidnappers. So hard to pull of a book like this off and make it believable, but at least for me the author did an amazing job. Revelations, secrets, some major dysfunction going on. A book where Wow, I just finished this and am completely bowled over about this being a debut novel. Talk about non-stop suspense. Told from three different perspective, during the kidnapping, after the kidnapping when they are trying to piece together what happened and from the detective while he is hunting for the kidnappers. So hard to pull of a book like this off and make it believable, but at least for me the author did an amazing job. Revelations, secrets, some major dysfunction going on. A book where the lines between the good guys and bad guys are incredibly blurred. A well written, suspenseful and engrossing read and definitely an author to watch. ARC from NetGalley.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mandie Kok

    We'd built a fire from nothing but wood. So says Good Girl character Colin Thatcher, bragging about his survival skills. I feel that the book can be summed up similarly: she'd written a book using nothing but words. That's all there is to it, words and words and more words, but very little else to recommend it to people who enjoy reading words. If you disagree with me and think that words are all it takes to write a novel, go read a phone book and then get back to me. I honestly feel torn about de We'd built a fire from nothing but wood. So says Good Girl character Colin Thatcher, bragging about his survival skills. I feel that the book can be summed up similarly: she'd written a book using nothing but words. That's all there is to it, words and words and more words, but very little else to recommend it to people who enjoy reading words. If you disagree with me and think that words are all it takes to write a novel, go read a phone book and then get back to me. I honestly feel torn about devoting any amount of time to writing a review of this book, but I feel cheated and would like to be able to share some words of my own. I don't say a thing. That's Colin Thatcher again. He's a character in this "story", but he doesn't do much, by his own admission. None of the "characters" do much, really. This book, somehow, has managed to garner comparisons to Gone Girl, when it is the complete opposite of that successful tale. Where Flynn creates complex characters, Kubica gathered some paper dolls and didn't even bother to paste them to sticks and make them move. They remain lifeless on each page. As Colin points out, he doesn't say a thing, along with the other characters, because the dialogue here is so painful that it is better for all concerned if the characters just cry and whine. Flynn created a convoluted plot, whereas Kubica took two sentences, called it a story and then spent over 300 pages obscuring that story, working her way backwards from the ending towards the two sentences that reveal to the reader what they're actually reading. I have no knowledge of professional sports. That's Eve, the most useless mother who never mothered. She has little to no knowledge of anything useful. She doesn't have a job. She's not a homemaker (And by homemaker you mean?...We have a cleaning lady, you know.). She can't cook. Supposedly concerned over the disappearance of her youngest daughter, Eve only contacted Mia twice during the year prior to the abduction. Now all of a sudden, Eve is one of the three narrators. Mrs Clueless doesn't have much to say, as you can imagine, so she spends some time thinking about how she met her husband and oh I'm sorry, I just fell asleep. Detective Whatshisface is another narrator. I assume that he journeyed all the way from a bad crime writer's reject pile to come and play cops and robbers in this story. What I know about Detective Whatshisface: He wears clothes. He forms unprofessional relationships with people involved in his cases. He has no life. How much I care about Detective Whatshisface: Who else? Oh yes, Colin. The guy. Um, well, he's this guy and he's in the story and he doesn't really talk or do anything except behave violently every now and then. Really, he has no redeeming qualities. Unfortunately for the reader, we are subjected to scenes like these: (view spoiler)["You look beautiful," I say and she does. But she reiterates in a whisper: Liar. She says she's never felt so revolting in her life. I settle my hands on the sides of her face. She's embarrassed and tries to look away, but I force her to look at me. "You look beautiful," I say again. (hide spoiler)] That's some Fifty Shades of Grey levels of "please, no, gross" right there. Also note that the use of the word "reiterates" here is incorrect. This is not the only instance of words being used incorrectly. The descriptions are frequently equally baffling: I watch the clumsy hair fall across her rosy cheeks, numb still from the winter air. Look at my numb cheeks! Look at them! Can you see how numb they are? Oh, the extent of their numbness is concealed by my clumsy hair? Forgive me. The sleeve of a black spandex top grazes my back. I'm sure she doesn't notice. But I do. Hahahahahahaha! Does the author even know what spandex is? In case you missed the 80's, spandex is a skin-tight fabric. If a spandex sleeve grazes something, you can be certain that the arm encased in the sleeve would have felt it, too. Because it's SPANDEX! Not a monk's robes! Why is this rich lady wearing long-sleeved spandex tops anyway? We travel along a two-lane road, through the Superior National Forest, surrounded by more vegetation than I believe I've ever seen in my entire life. Much of the greenery is dead now, buried under mounds of snow; it will not be unearthed until spring. Wow. Such green. Much vegetation. Wow. That's rich-girl Mia, whose daddy is a judge and whose mommy is a trophy wife (her own description) and she's never seen more verdant settings than these dead trees covered in snow. Wait, did I miss a twist? Was Mia actually raised in a basement the entire time and this whole story is her own fabrication to make sense of her new found freedom? Oh, no, this story is just STUPID. Listen, I'm not exaggerating. I'm going to wrap up this review now, so that I can devote my time to reading something better (I can guarantee that anything I read next will be better, because this was bottom of the barrel quality), but I want to make sure that you, dear reader, will fully grasp how bad (and dull and tedious) this story is. Usually I would say enjoyment of stories is subjective, I can understand how others might have liked this story, it just wasn't for me. Not this time. I'm serious. Those other reviewers, the ones who gave the book, this book, such high ratings?* They're aliens. Or they were abducted by aliens and then returned to earth, shells of their former selves. I don't know, but something happened to them, because this book? It's no good. Terrible, in fact. Very very bad. *No offense intended to the four and five star reviewers who enjoyed this book. I hope you get better soon.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Judy Collins

    A Killer Debut Novel! Mary Kubica’s THE GOOD GIRL will keep you entranced from the first page to the last—where nothing is, as it appears. A world of four desperate, and complex characters, with more in common than they may think. THE GOOD GIRL takes readers from the vibrant city of Chicago to a remote rustic cabin in the forest during the cold winter of Minnesota—where two people learn to trust one another. An intense and thought-provoking novel, ideal for book clubs and discussions. Readers wi A Killer Debut Novel! Mary Kubica’s THE GOOD GIRL will keep you entranced from the first page to the last—where nothing is, as it appears. A world of four desperate, and complex characters, with more in common than they may think. THE GOOD GIRL takes readers from the vibrant city of Chicago to a remote rustic cabin in the forest during the cold winter of Minnesota—where two people learn to trust one another. An intense and thought-provoking novel, ideal for book clubs and discussions. Readers will find themselves sympathizing with the two main characters, as their deepest feelings, struggles, and their dark pasts are uncovered— making for an intense page-turner mystery, you cannot put down. In a desperate attempt for retribution, the stage is set for a flawless plan of attack—kidnapping; choices are made which will forever change the lives of those involved. When fate steps in—nothing will ever be the same. Readers will be drawn into this world of intense emotion—from the alluring front cover to the funky font, carrying out the theme of this chilling and engaging tale. Told from different POV’s (Eve, Gabe, Colin) –flashing back and forth, between before and after the kidnapping; building the suspense, keeping you on the edge of your seat, with a dramatic climatic surprise ending, when we hear from Mia- what an exciting ride! Meet the Dennett’s, a family living in an elegant English Tudor home, along Chicago’s North Shore, a suburb near Lake Michigan, north of the city. They are filthy rich— as in most wealthy homes, not everything is as it seems on the exterior. THE CHARACTERS Eve Beautiful, mother of Mia and Grace, wife of James. A socialite, who was enamored with the man she married years ago; however, over the years her marriage is less than desirable. Arrived in the US at age eighteen, from England. James is not the husband and father, he once was—has power and greed changed him? She is closer to her daughter Mia, than Grace, warm and caring—she has to rethink her life and priorities when Mia is kidnapped. James Mia’s father and husband of Eve. A high-profile, and powerful judge—demanding, cold, wealthy. He has lost his way, trying to keep up with the pressure from his wealthy family. He has made many enemies during his career as a judge and many have scores to settle. He is closer to his daughter Grace, due to her drive and ambition in the legal world. He disagrees with his daughter, Mia’s life choices. He is non-supportive of his wife, even during the three months Mia is held captive (unless it involves his image or career). Colin/Owen A good heart, and nice looking guy---dealt an unlucky hand in life. No father figure, giving up his education to help support his sick mother, whom he loves. No way to pay for the high cost of her medicine and medical care, even working two jobs. He makes poor choices in his desperate attempt to keep his family afloat. Colin's job was to abduct Mia as part of a wild extortion plot and deliver her to his boss. However, the plan takes an unexpected turn when Colin suddenly decides to hide Mia in a secluded cabin in rural Minnesota, evading the police and his deadly superiors. Mia/Chloe Main character, free-spirited, twenty-four-year-old, talented art teacher an at inner-city alternative North Center high school. She does not follow the course her rich and powerful dad has set for her. She is rebellious, independent, yet altruistic, giving her time and effort, to those less fortunate, helping homeless and troubled teens. Dislikes her sister Grace and her demanding and controlling father. She lives in the Wrigleyville area of Chicago and easily reached via public transportation, where she lives in a small studio, modest apartment —living on her own since age eighteen, putting herself through college, refusing to live the life her father desired. Her father offers no financial or emotional support. Gabe Detective with the Chicago Police Department leads the case of Mia’s kidnapping. A likable character, smart, tough, and knows nothing about being in love. Has a heart of gold, a diamond in the rough—helps those who cannot help themselves. Works hand in hand with Mia’s mother, Eve to help solve the case- and becomes increasingly attracted to Eve, Mia’s mother— a beautiful British woman in her early 60s. He will stop at nothing to find Mia, however, no one expects what is to come. Grace Mia’s sister (secondary character) a senior associate at the law firm of Dalton & Meyers. Self-centered, and ruthless; does not get along with her sister Mia, and does not share her views on life. She, of course, is Daddy’s little girl, since his money buys her all the things her heart desires. With a mix of complex human dynamics, and a riveting suspense thriller, fans of Jodi Picoult, Diane Chamberlain, Liane Moriarty, Chevy Stevens, Lisa Gardner, and Tess Gerritsen will appreciate Kubica’s unique writing style, as she eloquently pulls back the tough layers piece by piece, looking deep into the soul, mind, and hearts of each of her well-developed characters. (Found myself bookmarking so many pages, as too good!). How does each person’s past shape them into the person they are today? How does each of the character’s lives change from the beginning of the book to the end? This dynamic novel is much more than a suspense thriller, a powerful novel—keeping readers thinking, long after the book ends and the lengths a person will go, in desperation, to protect their family. THE GOOD GIRL, hands down, a winner over Gone Girl. Highly recommend—looking forward to many more novels from this talented author (a sequel, perhaps)? A special thank you to MIRA and NetGalley for providing an ARC, in exchange for an honest review. JDCMustReadBooks TOP 30 BEST BOOKS OF 2014 Movie News Be sure and check out Kubica's next two 5 Stars winners: Pretty Baby On my top 10 Booklist of 2015 and Don't You Cry, Coming May 2016. Top 2016 List for sure!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    I picked up a copy of The Good Girl as the author, Ms. Mary Kubica, is scheduled for a Q&A in one of my Goodreads groups. I found this book to be an excellent debut novel and a highly enjoyable read. The Good Girl is an almost completely character-driven story; the main players are very well developed. If you are looking for a big dose of action and/or relentless suspense, this is not the book for you. The tale is about Mia, a prominent judge’s 25-year-old daughter, who is kidnapped in Chicag I picked up a copy of The Good Girl as the author, Ms. Mary Kubica, is scheduled for a Q&A in one of my Goodreads groups. I found this book to be an excellent debut novel and a highly enjoyable read. The Good Girl is an almost completely character-driven story; the main players are very well developed. If you are looking for a big dose of action and/or relentless suspense, this is not the book for you. The tale is about Mia, a prominent judge’s 25-year-old daughter, who is kidnapped in Chicago and ensconced with her abductor in an isolated cabin near the Gunflint Trail in northern Minnesota. The story is told via 3 different points of views—those of Eve (Mia’s mother), Gabe (the lead detective on the case) and Colin (the kidnapper). The time frame shifts back and forth between before and after Mia’s return to Chicago (not a spoiler). Though they sound a bit daunting, I found the frequent POV changes and time shifts to be minimally disruptive. Being allowed to enter the head of the bad guy, but not the victim was a unique experience that I quite enjoyed. The author did a terrific job in establishing Colin as a sympathetic character, though he certainly had his flaws, and I found myself rooting for him to pull off his dream plan. Despite the lack of much suspense throughout the first 50-70% of the story, my attention never flagged as I was so interested in what the characters were going to do. The pace and tension did pick up significantly over the last 25-30%, and I was even moved to tears a few times in the last 11%. There were a few things I did not care for. Initially I found the first person/present tense narrative a little distracting, but soon became accustomed to it. Being from Minnesota and familiar with its North Shore, I would have liked Ms. Kubica to have given her readers a “better feel” of the setting. I may be spoiled by William Kent Krueger’s command of pulling readers into the very same northern Minnesota locale, but still think Ms. Kubica could have done better with that. In addition, I thought Gabe, the lead detective, had an unrealistic amount of free time to devote to activities unrelated to the case. Finally, there were a number of times Ms. Kubica elected to tell us about conversations rather than have the characters speak. I like dialogue and would rather hear the words directly from the characters. I want to end by saying the epilogue packed a powerful punch. Holy cow, I sure didn’t see that coming!! Nice one, Ms. Kubica! All in all, I really enjoyed this novel and look forward to reading Ms. Kubica’s second offering, Pretty Baby. I recommend The Good Girl to all fans of psychological suspense, especially those who are willing to trade a bit of suspense for more interesting characters. I see a bright future for Mary Kubica and am very interested in seeing how she evolves as an author.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea Humphrey

    Well. I'm not sure whether to give this book a 3 or 4 star rating, so we'll call it a 3.5. Short synopsis: Mia is kidnapped by Colin. Colin is supposed to turn her over to those he works for. Colin decides to keep her in remote cabin instead. We spend entire novel trying to put together the pieces of this story as it is told out of order. Things I liked: I enjoyed the story being told out of order and by 3 different POV. To me, this kept things fresh and moving quickly. The chapters were short wh Well. I'm not sure whether to give this book a 3 or 4 star rating, so we'll call it a 3.5. Short synopsis: Mia is kidnapped by Colin. Colin is supposed to turn her over to those he works for. Colin decides to keep her in remote cabin instead. We spend entire novel trying to put together the pieces of this story as it is told out of order. Things I liked: I enjoyed the story being told out of order and by 3 different POV. To me, this kept things fresh and moving quickly. The chapters were short which made for a quick read as the story was able to hold my attention. I also was impressed that this was a debut novel; I found it well said and put together nicely for a first shot. Things I didn't like: I'm not sure that I can stress enough how much I hate every other novel being compared as "the next Gone Girl". To me, it set me up for slight disappointment and also gave away "the big twist". I was expecting it coming because of this blurb which made me a little angry and unsatisfied with the ending.This also caused me to expect a super intense/suspenseful novel, and while it definitely had an air of mystery and a little suspense, I wouldn't rank it up there with a Flynn novel. Overall I enjoyed the read, but it was nothing memorable or unique by any means. Would recommend for those in the mood for a quick read that can hold your attention with mild violence.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I hated this novel. It was neither suspenseful nor a thriller. There is a completely predictable "twist" at the end, but good luck making it that far. I skimmed the last 75%. For a while I tried to figure out what was bothering me-the lack of character motivation that made sense? My inability to figure out whether or not there was actually a protagonist? The contrived plot? The not-very-subtle-actually racism pervading the novel (seriously, the author should probably not include a Somali charact I hated this novel. It was neither suspenseful nor a thriller. There is a completely predictable "twist" at the end, but good luck making it that far. I skimmed the last 75%. For a while I tried to figure out what was bothering me-the lack of character motivation that made sense? My inability to figure out whether or not there was actually a protagonist? The contrived plot? The not-very-subtle-actually racism pervading the novel (seriously, the author should probably not include a Somali character when she's obviously never met a single Somali in her life) In the end, it was all of those things, but mostly it was that, despite the novel being written in first person from several points of view, I could not connect with a single character. I simply didn't care what happened to any of them or why. They weren't unlikable-it was worse; they were boring. You know what, now that I think about it, in a contest for what I hate most about the novel, I'm going to go with the racism. That it's completely boring is a close second. Oh, the only explanations I can think of for why so many reviewers are saying this is "The next Gone Girl" are A. They are being paid to say that, or B. They've never actually read Gone Girl.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    Mia is the 25 year old daughter of a Chicago judge. She is kidnapped, but the kidnapper changes his mind and doesn’t turn her over to the person that ordered the crime. Eventually, she is returned home but is in a total fog as to what has happened. The story is told by multiple narrators, and moves back and forth from before and after her return. The one person you never hear directly from is Mia herself, until the very end. It’s a character driven book, not big on action. It raises some interes Mia is the 25 year old daughter of a Chicago judge. She is kidnapped, but the kidnapper changes his mind and doesn’t turn her over to the person that ordered the crime. Eventually, she is returned home but is in a total fog as to what has happened. The story is told by multiple narrators, and moves back and forth from before and after her return. The one person you never hear directly from is Mia herself, until the very end. It’s a character driven book, not big on action. It raises some interesting questions at the end, concerning things like Stockholm Syndrome. The book isn’t a great mystery. I could tell what was going to happen and knew who the “bad guy” was well in advance of the ending. But It kept me engaged on long car rides. A solid 3 stars.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Elyse Walters

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. 2.7 Rating Jaw Dropping enthralling? No! Pulsates with Suspense? No! Heart-pounding mystery? No! 'FAIR' READ? Yes! I kept thinking if *Annie*, (kidnapped in the novel, "STILL MISSING"), and *Mia*, abducted in "The Good Girl", met for coffee, they'd become GREAT FRIENDS.... sharing 'CABIN STORIES' together. haha! The writing style in "The Good Girl" --starts off engaging in the beginning-- then soon becomes annoying. Its no longer a novelty to see an author write a novel from three different poin 2.7 Rating Jaw Dropping enthralling? No! Pulsates with Suspense? No! Heart-pounding mystery? No! 'FAIR' READ? Yes! I kept thinking if *Annie*, (kidnapped in the novel, "STILL MISSING"), and *Mia*, abducted in "The Good Girl", met for coffee, they'd become GREAT FRIENDS.... sharing 'CABIN STORIES' together. haha! The writing style in "The Good Girl" --starts off engaging in the beginning-- then soon becomes annoying. Its no longer a novelty to see an author write a novel from three different points of view. It seemed the only purpose for these 3-points of view was to delay telling the punch line. (I started to feel impatient, bored, and annoyed). Then, the ridiculous ending destroyed 'all' integrity of this story. Much like the silly ending in "STILL MISSING". Mia's mother, *Eve*, (repressed trophy wife), was the only person I had 'some' sympathy & compassion for because she at least seemed to take a look at her personal responsibility for being a mother. Before the kidnapping she was a wife without-a-voice, a neglectful mom. She allowed her dominate husband the parenting leader role, After the kidnapping, *Eve* sincerely worked at transforming herself -- wanting to be a better mother to her daughter. Plus --She began to find her own voice for herself again! THIS WOULD NOT happen --EVER ----(the author could not get me to believe this no matter what)!!! NO WAY would we EVER see a JUDGE --(a white middle Class Man --Educated -JUDGE) --be sent behind bars and disbarred ----as we did in this story. It made NO SENSE. There was not have enough of ANYTHING to merit that outcome. (it was just silly). One more note: I hate to even write this --(as I don't notice it often) ---but it didn't feel right to notice a racist/slant- description in this book. (I'm guessing its not in her heart of this author) ---but I would hope she might be more careful with her next book. When everything else is done being said ---(good/bad...etc.) I would also like to offer my congrats to the author. This was her first book!!! Congrats on THAT!!!! May she enjoy the experience of her success ---and may we read many more of her books!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kelly (and the Book Boar)

    Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/ It’s the next Gone Girl!!!! Trust me Amy, we ALL want to punch you two in the face at this point. Okay, so like errrrrrry other book that claimed it was going to be the “next Gone Girl” – this one wasn’t. However, momma likey the new Harlequin dark and seedy romance genre : ) Since this was a mystery/thriller I won’t say much for fear that I’ll give too much away. The basic premise has been done a time or two before: Colin Thatcher is a g Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/ It’s the next Gone Girl!!!! Trust me Amy, we ALL want to punch you two in the face at this point. Okay, so like errrrrrry other book that claimed it was going to be the “next Gone Girl” – this one wasn’t. However, momma likey the new Harlequin dark and seedy romance genre : ) Since this was a mystery/thriller I won’t say much for fear that I’ll give too much away. The basic premise has been done a time or two before: Colin Thatcher is a gun-for-hire type of criminal (with a heart of gold - because OF COURSE, right?) who has been assigned the task of . . . kidnapping Mia Dennett, but when a case of guilty conscience gets to Colin before he can turn Mia over to the real bad guy he hightails it to a cabin in the woods, with Mia in tow. It’s there that we follow the wibbly wobbly timeline in order to piece the whole story together. It’s also there that Mia gets a case of Stockholm Syndrome resulting in . . . “The last time I pushed her away, but the last time was different. She was a different woman. I was a different man.” and then some . . . Obviously if that’s not your idea of a good time, you should go ahead and skip this one. I’m giving it 3 Stars because I think it was a right place/right time read for me. It was a real slow roller with just enough ewwww factor to get me back in Mitchell’s good graces after a porntastic couple of weeks. And also for that ending . . . (view spoiler)[ (hide spoiler)] ^^^^Did I get you???? Ha! I kill me!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Clumsy Storyteller

    Maaan, This book is really a good twisty dark novel .The ending was heartbreaking and infuriating , I was so mad and upset when I finished it I literally did throw it across the room ! The story is about Mia, a 25 year old girl who is kidnapped from a bar, Colin/Owen is hired to kidnap Mia and deliver her to Dalmar , Colin was following Mia for a really long time before making any move toward her (view spoiler)[( Dalmar : the man who was Hired by Mia to kidnape her and ask her father for ransome Maaan, This book is really a good twisty dark novel .The ending was heartbreaking and infuriating , I was so mad and upset when I finished it I literally did throw it across the room ! The story is about Mia, a 25 year old girl who is kidnapped from a bar, Colin/Owen is hired to kidnap Mia and deliver her to Dalmar , Colin was following Mia for a really long time before making any move toward her (view spoiler)[( Dalmar : the man who was Hired by Mia to kidnape her and ask her father for ransome but Colin was worried about her so he didn't frop her and ignored all dalmar's calls asking about where the girl is, Mia's mother informed the police of her disappearance. in the end of the book Mia was found traumatized, pregnant and colin was killed !! he was fucking protecting her and he ... :'( i can't even ... ! ) (hide spoiler)] A one-sentence summary " Simple abductions suddenly become much more complicated".

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dem

    The Good Girl by Mary Kubica was a well written debut novel with a plot that is intereting enough to keep the reader turning the pages The story is told from multiple perspectives and is quite easy to follow. This is the sort of book that provides enough suspense to keep you reading and yet by the end you finish with a somewhat sigh of relief and while it was good you are left feeling it could have been better if.................. While I liked the book I kept comparing it to Still Missing which I The Good Girl by Mary Kubica was a well written debut novel with a plot that is intereting enough to keep the reader turning the pages The story is told from multiple perspectives and is quite easy to follow. This is the sort of book that provides enough suspense to keep you reading and yet by the end you finish with a somewhat sigh of relief and while it was good you are left feeling it could have been better if.................. While I liked the book I kept comparing it to Still Missing which I had read last year and gave it the same rating. I think the plot fell down in places and I am not sure this is one I would recommend. It was one of those book that I liked but not really one for my favorites list.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Erin Burba

    Honestly? I hated this book. The characters were flat and unlikeable, the plot was boring. Everything was a cliche. The worst part is that it was pretty racist. One of the characters, who is black, is described as having "serpentine eyes" and being wild and unpredictable and physically threatening. The author- multiple times- mentioned whether or not there were black people around SPECIFICALLY to indicate the level of danger or the niceness of the neighborhood. It's pretty unbelievable that the b Honestly? I hated this book. The characters were flat and unlikeable, the plot was boring. Everything was a cliche. The worst part is that it was pretty racist. One of the characters, who is black, is described as having "serpentine eyes" and being wild and unpredictable and physically threatening. The author- multiple times- mentioned whether or not there were black people around SPECIFICALLY to indicate the level of danger or the niceness of the neighborhood. It's pretty unbelievable that the book was allowed to be published with overtly racist implications. I honestly don't think that the author intended to come across this way but I don't know if that makes it better or worse. Probably the worst book I've read this year.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lori

    Ho Humm.... That's my initial feeling after finishing this! It certainly wasn't bad, I just felt like I kind of meandered through waiting for something exciting to happen! I was kept interested mainly because I knew something had to happen because it was only 350 pgs! The 'twist' kept it from being 2 stars.... But Iit was ''too little, too late' for me to award more stars!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sandy *The world could end while I was reading and I would never notice*

    It's not that Mia was a particularly good girl - she was pretty normal really; got drunk as a teenager, did all the normal things that most of us do. But she had a good heart, a kind heart. She's not particularly close to her family, but that's normal in the first flight of independence, and they don't understand her anyway. She is not a high achiever like her sister Grace. She is a disappointment to her father, a judge. Even when the school where she teaches phones to say Mia hasn't shown for wo It's not that Mia was a particularly good girl - she was pretty normal really; got drunk as a teenager, did all the normal things that most of us do. But she had a good heart, a kind heart. She's not particularly close to her family, but that's normal in the first flight of independence, and they don't understand her anyway. She is not a high achiever like her sister Grace. She is a disappointment to her father, a judge. Even when the school where she teaches phones to say Mia hasn't shown for work and they are unable to contact her, her family are unconcerned. But they will be...... This is my second Mary Kubica read in a short time, and I loved it. It is a kidnapping. With a twist. Or two. I find it very easy to get very involved in Kubica's characters. Her plots are twisty and contain a little of everything. Kubica is fast becoming one of my favourite authors.

  22. 5 out of 5

    May

    DE LO MEJOR QUE HE LEÍDO ESTE AÑO Una buena chica es un thriller trepidante que me ha enganchado a su lectura como hace mucho tiempo no me enganchaba a un libro. Una novela cargada de giros, con personajes profundizados y con unos toques psicológicos que la han hecho de lo mejor que he leído este año y que, sin duda, no dejará indiferente a nadie. ¡Menudo novelón! Cayó en mis manos porque la editorial me lo dio entre otros libros y ni siquiera sabía que existía. De hecho lo leí sin saber qué es DE LO MEJOR QUE HE LEÍDO ESTE AÑO Una buena chica es un thriller trepidante que me ha enganchado a su lectura como hace mucho tiempo no me enganchaba a un libro. Una novela cargada de giros, con personajes profundizados y con unos toques psicológicos que la han hecho de lo mejor que he leído este año y que, sin duda, no dejará indiferente a nadie. ¡Menudo novelón! Cayó en mis manos porque la editorial me lo dio entre otros libros y ni siquiera sabía que existía. De hecho lo leí sin saber qué esperarme de él y ha superado cualquier expectativa que pudiera tener. La trama de Una buena chica es compleja y siniestra. Me ha encantado la idea general y cómo ha ido evolucionando la historia. Sobre todo me ha gustado que esté repleta de giros inesperados y que se revuelva todo de manera brillante e inesperada. Tiene un final que desmonta cualquier teoría que tuviera el lector y eso ha hecho que finalmente me gustara incluso más. La novela está narrada desde tres puntos de vista: el secuestrador, la madre de la secuestrada y el detective que intenta resolver el caso. Me ha gustado muchísimo también el estilo narrativo porque mezcla diferentes voces que suscitan el interés en la lectura y aportan más elementos a la trama principal. En resumen, ha sido una novela que me ha encantado, que no he podido parar de leer, que juega psicológicamente con los personajes y que tiene un final de infarto. De lo mejorcito que he leído este año.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Krystin Rachel (Here's The Fucking Twist)

    After all of the glowing reviews I've seen for Mary Kubica, this was actually a bit of a disappointment. Whomp, whomp Someone has paid to have Mia kidnapped. Colin, her kidnapper, is hired to do the dirty work. But instead of taking her to his boss, he whisks Mia away to a remote cabin and keeps her for himself. As one would if they were kidnapping another human being.  My god, doesn't it just seem like SO MUCH WORK? Who would want to kidnap someone?  Like, I get home from work and all I want to do After all of the glowing reviews I've seen for Mary Kubica, this was actually a bit of a disappointment. Whomp, whomp Someone has paid to have Mia kidnapped. Colin, her kidnapper, is hired to do the dirty work. But instead of taking her to his boss, he whisks Mia away to a remote cabin and keeps her for himself. As one would if they were kidnapping another human being.  My god, doesn't it just seem like SO MUCH WORK? Who would want to kidnap someone?  Like, I get home from work and all I want to do is take off my bra and lay facedown on my mattress while I make ughhhhh ohhhsd nooooo noises and eventually my husband asks me what's wrong and I can trick him into rubbing my back. The LAST thing I want to do, is come home from work and have to take care of a person chained in my basement, stinking up the place. Getting their dirty, unwashed butt on stuff. Then you have to empty their piss pots and make them food.  No, thank you. You have to be a special kind of psychopath to want to abduct someone for the "joy" of getting to take care of a adult sized baby. I am far too lazy for that. Told in three parts - Colin, Mia's mother and the detective on the case - the story bounces back and forth between Mia being missing and Mia being found. Mia's perspective is saved for the epilogue. A little twist ending that I enjoyed (if you're paying attention you can figure it out beforehand), but overall, without Mia being given a voice, the events that happened to her feel detached and impassive. And, while I usually really like novels that pull off the before/after trope, this time around it just didn't have the same punch. The prose were average, when they should have been vibrant and sharp. And the story itself - the clues, the "twists", the climax and small reveals - were tame and uninspired. The characters were pretty awful - I couldn't drum up much emotion for them. The mother was annoying, the detective was a silly caricature of what a detective should be, and Colin was lame. He was written, seemingly, to be brooding and dark, but I found myself rolling my eyes at him extra hard. The pacing of events felt clunky, resulting in a story that moved pretty slowly along with some ho-hum characters, who lacked depth and unique voices. (There's also some subtle racism which felt lazy and unnecessary. Whoooo!) I'm not saying it was a bad novel, but feeling indifferent once it's over is usually a bad sign for me. There wasn't anything special about this. It's been done before, and done better. The themes, especially, have been done to death. It's true what they say - there are no new ideas. And every writer has a different take on the same old ones - sometimes that personal interpretation results in nothing special. And other times it results in the best book I've ever read. This was nothing special. It lacked that kick-to-the-face (metaphorically) that makes your eyes pop and your mind spin. This one didn't illicit much more than a shoulder shrug from me. Still Missing by Chevy Stevens did this so much better. That one got 5 stars from moi. I can't bring myself to this give anymore than 2.5, rounded up.

  24. 5 out of 5

    emma

    not rating this because it was a fine thriller but it was also pro-life as hell!! and that's really going to distract from the rest of the book for me. don't @ me thanks!!!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    This riveting story grabbed my attention and held me captive. It is woven with twists and turns which will surprise any reader. My favorite part of the book was the smartly structured and creative format, jumping both in perspective and time. The story is told from alternating perspectives of Colin, Mia’s anxious mother, Eve, Gabe Hoffman, the detective on her case and finally from Mia herself. Each of the narrators are adding to the story by unraveling Mia’s life both before and after the abduc This riveting story grabbed my attention and held me captive. It is woven with twists and turns which will surprise any reader. My favorite part of the book was the smartly structured and creative format, jumping both in perspective and time. The story is told from alternating perspectives of Colin, Mia’s anxious mother, Eve, Gabe Hoffman, the detective on her case and finally from Mia herself. Each of the narrators are adding to the story by unraveling Mia’s life both before and after the abduction. Seeing Mia from the four different perspectives is a gratifying way to add depth to the story. I listened to the audio version of the book and found both the writing and the format surprisingly easy to follow and understand. The vivid descriptions of the frozen and snow-filled Minnesota forest had me layering on blankets as I was reading. The main characters were well developed, and while I didn’t necessarily love any of them, it affirmed my realization that you don’t need to love the characters to love the book. Although it certainly doesn’t hurt! The Good Girl was author Mary Kubica’s 2014 debut novel. Since then she has published three additional novels: Pretty Baby (2015), Don’t You Cry (2016) and Every Last Lie in 2017. So I guess I’m a little late coming to the table and have some catching up to do!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Britany

    An excellent thriller about a woman (Mia Dennett) who is abducted for ransom and the plan goes wrong, or does it? Dun dun dunnnnn… The chapters alternate between Eve (Mia’s mother), Gabe (detective), and Colin (the abductor). We learn all about Mia’s family including her dad who is a prominent judge in Chicago and the world’s biggest jerk! The storyline also veers from ‘before’ and ‘after’—and as a reader, I could feel the tension mounting as the plot got closer and closer to whatever ‘IT’ was. T An excellent thriller about a woman (Mia Dennett) who is abducted for ransom and the plan goes wrong, or does it? Dun dun dunnnnn… The chapters alternate between Eve (Mia’s mother), Gabe (detective), and Colin (the abductor). We learn all about Mia’s family including her dad who is a prominent judge in Chicago and the world’s biggest jerk! The storyline also veers from ‘before’ and ‘after’—and as a reader, I could feel the tension mounting as the plot got closer and closer to whatever ‘IT’ was. The author pulled this off brilliantly. While I was sweating with no power, reading about the frigid weather and ice cold lake helped me to cool off. This was a fabulous book that I couldn’t put down. I had to find out what this event was and how it all played out. Of course—while I had suspicions, I’m terrible at figuring these things out, and Kubica eluded me, leaving me with a satisfying ending. Not sure how this is Kubica’s debut, because it read as though she’s a prolific writer- one that easily creates suspense and had a succinct plotline. I would recommend this to anyone looking to escape and are ready to turn those pages! The only issue I had was (view spoiler)[ what was the point of Grace? (Mia’s sister)—she literally served no purpose IMO (hide spoiler)] Looking forward to more from this author.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    I loved this book The Good Girl Kubica is a well written novel which was a real page turner warning the book goes backwards & forwards which i am getting used to the plot was great & i felt a liking towards Colin The Protagonist he had a close relationship to Mia & she became very attached to him Stockholm Syndrome. I hated her father the judge he was a cantankerous person who was very manipulative & had his own agendas i could not believe the ending . really enjoyed this book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mainlinebooker

    For fans of Gone Girl, you will love The Good Girl..Highly suspenseful, I finished it in 2 days. The story revolves around a woman who is kidnapped and spends time with her assailant in the backwoods of Minnesota. Three different narrators, her mother, the police detective and the kidnapper share their feelings and stories of before and after the kidnapping.I am not going to say anymore at the risk of being a plot spoiler but the ending threw me for a loop..This is going to be a blockbuster!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jonetta

    Mia Dennett goes to a bar one evening, planning to meet up with the man she's been seeing. He cancels after she arrives but ends up with Colin Thatcher, a man hired to abduct her. What ensues is a bizarre story told by several narrators. I found the story interesting, especially its use of multiple characters to tell the story in the past and present. I never found it confusing and it was delivered coherently despite it not being linear storytelling, sort of like lots of asides before you get th Mia Dennett goes to a bar one evening, planning to meet up with the man she's been seeing. He cancels after she arrives but ends up with Colin Thatcher, a man hired to abduct her. What ensues is a bizarre story told by several narrators. I found the story interesting, especially its use of multiple characters to tell the story in the past and present. I never found it confusing and it was delivered coherently despite it not being linear storytelling, sort of like lots of asides before you get the whole tale. Where the story fell flat for me is with the storytelling. Aside from Colin, most of the time the characters were telling the facts instead of allowing us to experience the story. I never connected with any of them except Colin who I connected with emotionally despite my intense dislike of him. There were three narrators telling the story and one delivering the epilogue. They were all outstanding, especially Colin's who nailed everything about the man. He created a vivid imprint of the character. I liked the story and enjoyed listening to it for reasons already stated. I really wanted to find out how it ended, even though I figured most things out. I'm rating this 3.5 stars but rounding to 4 because of the audio performances.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rose

    Quick review for a not so quick, and often infuriating read. For Mary Kubica's "The Good Girl" - I'll admit this book kept me reading for quite a bit of the novel to see what would happen through the perspectives of Eve, Gabe and Colin. I really liked the audio narration among a multiple narrative cast, and I did find myself marathoning the book to see what happened in the overarching, ongoing mystery. Mia is a young woman - a teacher - who goes missing under suspicious circumstances. Eve, her m Quick review for a not so quick, and often infuriating read. For Mary Kubica's "The Good Girl" - I'll admit this book kept me reading for quite a bit of the novel to see what would happen through the perspectives of Eve, Gabe and Colin. I really liked the audio narration among a multiple narrative cast, and I did find myself marathoning the book to see what happened in the overarching, ongoing mystery. Mia is a young woman - a teacher - who goes missing under suspicious circumstances. Eve, her mother, is beside herself with worry while grappling issues with her daughter's disappearance and an unhappy marriage, Gabe is the investigator assigned to Mia's case, and Colin is the man who - for all intents and purposes - ends up kidnapping Mia. Things are not all what they seem in this given scenario. Or are they? I could tell "The Good Girl" wanted to be a twisty, smart, maybe romantic thriller with a shock ending, but it really didn't come across that way to me at all. I found the characters very predictable and shallow, despite their noted flaws and circumstances. The Stockholm syndrome relationship that was Colin and Mia's (despite revelations that were made later in the book) did not pass muster with me. I thought it was undeveloped and unconvincing. I was also not impressed with the subtle and overt racism that was in this book. What the heck was up with the overfocus on the characters being white and privileged, though somehow a "minority" in a mostly black environment? What was with the subtle suggestions of the black characters somehow being shady - suggesting bad actions despite Colin being a so-called sympathetic hero for all the crap that he did? (Nevermind his reasons - Colin's somehow touted as "unlucky" and unfortunate with the circumstances with his mother, while the so called player behind the scenes is "evil" and "dark" and "black". Seriously, the more I read into this not-so-subtle language, the more I sank in my seat and kept getting thrown out of the story. It vexed me to no end.) And guys, I guessed the ending. I guessed the ending from probably about halfway through the book, so it was not a surprise to me at all. It made sense why Mia was so accepting and willing to go with Colin, despite some measures of fear and anguish. It made sense that the terms of the expectations of the characters didn't go as planned, for any one of the characters that were players in this scenario. While the biggest twist wasn't revealed until the very last part of the book through Mia's perspective, it really didn't resonate with me at all. I think if Mia had been a much stronger asserted character, if the focus of this book didn't have such odd angles such as the oddly denouncing racist language and the odd shipment of the relationship between Colin and Mia, I think I might've liked more parts of this book. But I can't in good measure forgive the narrative for the sloppy handling of the mystery and unveiling of it all. Just didn't measure up to me compared to narratives that have asserted their elements in much stronger ways. Despite its issues, I'm willing to try another book by Kubica, but I'll admit this read both vexed and disappointed me, and more on the level for things that detracted from its overarching aim and story. Overall score: 1.5/5 stars

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