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Salad Samurai: 100 Cutting-Edge, Ultra-Hearty, Easy-to-Make Salads You Don't Have to Be Vegan to Love PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: Salad Samurai: 100 Cutting-Edge, Ultra-Hearty, Easy-to-Make Salads You Don't Have to Be Vegan to Love
Author: Terry Hope Romero
Publisher: Published June 10th 2014 by Da Capo Lifelong Books
ISBN: null
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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Go beyond the pale of iceberg lettuce with recipes for indulgent salads of plant-based proteins, vibrant veggies, and zesty dressings.

30 review for Salad Samurai: 100 Cutting-Edge, Ultra-Hearty, Easy-to-Make Salads You Don't Have to Be Vegan to Love

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bookdragon Sean

    Doesn’t this book have such a cool name? Salad Samurai. It sounds good. The recipes are quite nice too!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Delphine

    I think this is my favorite cookbook, ever. Not even my favorite vegan cookbook - I ate meat most of my life and am a bit of cookbook hoarder. This one, though, is just unbelievable. So much variety (so much!) Lots of different flavors, often with multiple options to switch up a recipe. And the recipes are all so good! This is the one cookbook I've actually made more than a handful of dishes from. I actually try one each week because I really haven't been disappointed so why stop now! Plus it's I think this is my favorite cookbook, ever. Not even my favorite vegan cookbook - I ate meat most of my life and am a bit of cookbook hoarder. This one, though, is just unbelievable. So much variety (so much!) Lots of different flavors, often with multiple options to switch up a recipe. And the recipes are all so good! This is the one cookbook I've actually made more than a handful of dishes from. I actually try one each week because I really haven't been disappointed so why stop now! Plus it's vegan. And it's healthy vegan - no weird ingredients, nothing bad-for-you in it. Terry Hope Romero is a genius chef and I will definitely be buying more of her cookbooks.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Don

    This book is paperback with "only" 100 recipes and much smaller than her previous books. Nonetheless, it's very well presented and has plenty of professional looking pictures. She starts with recipes for dressings that include creamy ones as well as vinaigrettes. She follows with recipes of toppings that includes nuts, croutons, as tofu, and a couple of "bacon" topping recipes using tempeh and coconut. She offers up a couple of side salads, but the bulk of the books are salads that can be eaten as This book is paperback with "only" 100 recipes and much smaller than her previous books. Nonetheless, it's very well presented and has plenty of professional looking pictures. She starts with recipes for dressings that include creamy ones as well as vinaigrettes. She follows with recipes of toppings that includes nuts, croutons, as tofu, and a couple of "bacon" topping recipes using tempeh and coconut. She offers up a couple of side salads, but the bulk of the books are salads that can be eaten as a meal. The salad recipes include plenty of veggies, as well as fruit, noodles, potatoes, protein like tofu, seitan and tempeh and they look mouth watering. Ms. Hope Romero is an amazing cookbook writer and I don't think this book will disappoint her fans or people new to vegan cooking. The index looks adequate, but I've yet to use it. Five stars from me.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    I was skeptical of this cookbook initially - the recipes sometimes call for ingredients that are difficult or expensive to source outside of certain niche (vegan, Brooklyn) enclaves; soaked nut-based dressings are supposed to replace the classic egg-based originals; the textures of the "sweet & savory" section are skin-crawling (e.g. smoothie bowls). These reservations aside, the organization of the book is faultless (recipes are organized seasonally, and the author walks you through a week o I was skeptical of this cookbook initially - the recipes sometimes call for ingredients that are difficult or expensive to source outside of certain niche (vegan, Brooklyn) enclaves; soaked nut-based dressings are supposed to replace the classic egg-based originals; the textures of the "sweet & savory" section are skin-crawling (e.g. smoothie bowls). These reservations aside, the organization of the book is faultless (recipes are organized seasonally, and the author walks you through a week of shopping and prep-work in a few short paragraphs), the salads themselves are nutritious, original, filling (most work as entrees or stand-alone meals - satisfying even the biggest appetite), crowd pleasing (they scale well), easy to modify (if you are lacking ingredients or time) and most importantly, delicious. This book provides both a creative jolt and a handful of new standards to add to your regular repertoire, and proves worthwhile for vegans and omnivores alike.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Brianne

    Interesting book, and I'd probably try a couple of the salads.

  6. 4 out of 5

    kimberly

    SUPER impressed. who knew that raw cashews soaked in hot water could make a creamy salad dressing?!? i didn't realize this was a vegan cookbook, but finally. FINALLY. i feel like vegans can actually eat well without only eating food that's made to look like meats, or subsisting on oreos! #newfoundrespect #worstbookname

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Chew

    LOVE!!! Everything I have made so far has been great. Healthy but so tasty!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Probably 4.5 stars - the flavors are unparalleled. Terry is a chef extraordinaire, and like her other books, the recipes are slyly quite involved. Expect to really work to get there.

  9. 5 out of 5

    BookBec

    This cookbook looked very interesting ... I marked a lot of recipes to try. But three salads, one breakfast, and a dressing later, I'm not as excited. They're said to be easy to make, but IMHO, 45 minutes for 2 servings and several sub-recipes isn't an easy meal. And many of the recipes require quite a stretch of the imagination to consider them "salads." The grain salads ended up feeling like too much of one thing for a meal -- I'd rather have had a half-serving along with something else on my p This cookbook looked very interesting ... I marked a lot of recipes to try. But three salads, one breakfast, and a dressing later, I'm not as excited. They're said to be easy to make, but IMHO, 45 minutes for 2 servings and several sub-recipes isn't an easy meal. And many of the recipes require quite a stretch of the imagination to consider them "salads." The grain salads ended up feeling like too much of one thing for a meal -- I'd rather have had a half-serving along with something else on my plate. I tried a green salad with chimichurri chickpeas, and much as I love a local restaurant's chimichurri sauce, this version did nothing for me. The one salad my family liked involved a lot of tweaks on my part: cooking Brussels sprouts instead of massaging them raw, adding chicken in place of portobellos, upping the oil in the dressing. Overall I think these recipes would benefit from more oil -- there are plenty of good fats out there, and we certainly aren't going over our calorie limits by eating vegan salads. The only recipe I found a winner was overnight soaked oats for breakfast, and it's really stretching things to call that a salad.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lara

    I was that weirdo kid who, when asked what my favorite food was, would respond "salad" (well, that or spinach with mayonnaise on top...um). I was also that weirdo teen. Aaaaaaaand I am still that weirdo adult. I really, really love salad and always have. I'm usually not all that impressed with salad recipes though for some reason. I think so many of them just seem so like, duh, you know? But the ones in this book almost all look really good, and I like that it also includes recipes for different I was that weirdo kid who, when asked what my favorite food was, would respond "salad" (well, that or spinach with mayonnaise on top...um). I was also that weirdo teen. Aaaaaaaand I am still that weirdo adult. I really, really love salad and always have. I'm usually not all that impressed with salad recipes though for some reason. I think so many of them just seem so like, duh, you know? But the ones in this book almost all look really good, and I like that it also includes recipes for different dressings and crunchy toppings, and, interestingly enough, some in the back that are for like...dessert salads? Breakfast salads? I dunno, but I wanna eat 'em! I'm not generally very deliberate about salads--I'm mostly of the just-throw-a-bunch-of-random-stuff-in-a-bowl-and-eat-it variety--but I am actually really excited about following these recipes. Well done, Terry Hope Romero!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I originally bought this book my Mother for Christmas. She said she wanted to eat more vegetables, so I thought this would be a great book for that. At the time my Mom was living with my sister while looking for a new home, so my sister ended up flipping through and liking a few recipes. So she bought the book for herself. Funny thing is for awhile my Mother and my sister would tell me to make a recipe from the book, and I keep pointing out that I don’t own it. I still don’t. I’ve been checking o I originally bought this book my Mother for Christmas. She said she wanted to eat more vegetables, so I thought this would be a great book for that. At the time my Mom was living with my sister while looking for a new home, so my sister ended up flipping through and liking a few recipes. So she bought the book for herself. Funny thing is for awhile my Mother and my sister would tell me to make a recipe from the book, and I keep pointing out that I don’t own it. I still don’t. I’ve been checking out from the library. I think I was afraid because the book is so small. Did I REALLY need a whole book on salads? Answer- yeah- I really do. Photos Not a big fan of the black side bars. Although I LOVE how visually it is different from other cookbooks, it is easy to leave marks on it. I think the biggest issue is the fact that it is a salad cookbook, meaning you are using oil for dressings, and I left quite a few greasy finger prints on the side (right where you touch to turn the page!). And since this is a library book, I could easily see which recipes other patrons made (hello Fiery Fruit and Quinoa Salad!) Naturally my vegan mind is racing- are they vegan? Are they omnivores diving into the vegan world? Did they like it?! As always I love the photos in the book. They are done by my second favorite food photographer (my main man will always be Ted *insert winkie face*) Vanessa K Rees. I've mentioned it in other reviews, but she has worked with Romero before for Protein Ninja and Moskowitz for Isa Does It. You will recognize her signature style photographing from above. If you want a preview of the sexy photography there are some on her website. What I do love about the photos is that the images aren’t unrealistic. Nothing bothers me more than inaccurate photos. I’ve caught a few photos in other books where CLEARLY different vegetables are in the dish, or the color is unattainable. What I like about these photos is the dishes are shown as a reasonable end result. The green apples are big chunks for the Reubenesque salad for example. And there notes when they are being fancy, like in the Mermaid salad (no, I sadly didn’t make this) They spiralized the beets instead of julienned them. Set-up The book is divided up by the introduction/information, dressings, side salads, salad toppers, spring, summer, fall, winter, and then breakfast ‘salads.’ The last chapter is clearly bending the definition of a salad, and frankly the easiest to ignore. Sorry. But I am glad she divided the recipes up by seasons. Yeah, sure you can make a winter salad in the summer (or vise versa) but if you have a CSA share, you would much rather wait till the summer when the produce is super fresh, knowing it will taste better. This is also why I have tried mostly the winter and fall salads, I keep making salads during this time of the year. Writing I feel a little crazy writing this- but Romero’s writing is a little bland in this. Sure there is a lot of wit and spunk in the introduction, but not as much personality in the descriptions. Maybe I am just imagining that? Regardless, I think my favorite part of the book- no diet talk. No talk about gurl you gonna be so thin with this salad talk. Overview Vegans have a love hate relationship with salads. So many times we know in the back of our minds that if we go to a restaurant there will “always be a salad option.” A lot times it is sad and pathetic- iceberg lettuce, oil and vinegar, and subpar veggies cut in large chunks. I had a similar issue when living with my in-laws. Although they are great cooks, every single dinner included a side salad with oil and vinegar. I think they genuinely enjoyed this, but I couldn’t help but think of better uses of the lettuce. Salads have been morphed into the pinnacle of diet culture and clean eating. It has been called out for being an excuse to starve yourself, and for being overrated. Most salads in American culture are either heavy fat-calorie bombs (pasta salad, chicken/tuna/egg salad and the like) or watery-crunchy-vegetable based meals that are so bland you need to drench them in dressings. But if you ever got a salad from a higher-end restaurant, you will know they are so much more. It is a delicate balance of flavors as you only have a few ingredients, they need to work with each other. There is also the question of quality, if your produce isn’t at it’s peak quality your salad is lacking. And this is what Romero addresses in her book. She wants you to use produce when it is fresh- and that’s why she organizes everything by season. She wants people to eat well thought out, flavorful salads that are more than lettuce, cucumber, and radishes. Pretty much Romero wants to take salads away from rich white women who are littering their wellness Pinterest boards with expensive fancy looking salads, and trying to democratize them. They are filling, full of flavor, and pretty affordable. Salads, at least in this book, are for everyone. And I love Romero for being able to accomplish that. Recipes As with all my cookbook reviews, I try my best to leave links with recipes that are online BUT are up there with the publishers permission. I also won’t link recipes that might stray too far away from the recipe (which some bloggers do) I also made sure I provided at least one recipe from each section of the book. Read the Recipe Reviews on My Blog

  12. 5 out of 5

    Chrissy

    My top five reasons why this book is fantastically amazing. 1. The insanely, gorgeously delicious photographs throughout the entire book 2. The lovely glossy pages make me feel as if I'm reading a favorite magazine instead of a cookbook 3. The scrumptious salads that look healthy, beautiful, and incredibly tasty 4. The salad dressings, which seem easy to replicate and delicious to devour 5. The breakfast selections. Yes, that's right -- a salad book with incredibly appealing early morning suggestions My top five reasons why this book is fantastically amazing. 1. The insanely, gorgeously delicious photographs throughout the entire book 2. The lovely glossy pages make me feel as if I'm reading a favorite magazine instead of a cookbook 3. The scrumptious salads that look healthy, beautiful, and incredibly tasty 4. The salad dressings, which seem easy to replicate and delicious to devour 5. The breakfast selections. Yes, that's right -- a salad book with incredibly appealing early morning suggestions. And then, of course, there's my overall top reason why this book is fantastically amazing: It's totally, 100% vegan... and healthy. Five stars for my five top reasons that I absolutely MUST have SALAD SAMURAI on my bookshelf ASAP!

  13. 4 out of 5

    PorshaJo

    My first thought on seeing this book was 'I don't need a book about salads'. But a bulletin board discussing this book had many lively discussions on the book, with people posting mouthwatering photos of salads. I grabbed this one from the library and was immediately smitten with it. My biggest hurdle was deciding which one to make first. I can see this book getting a lot of use in my house, especially during the summer months when all I eat is salads. Another great book by Terry Hope Romero.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    I've been eating out of this book for weeks, deliciously happy ever since.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nichole

    This vegan cookbook belongs at the same level as Thug Kitchen as far as great, inspiring, delicious, creative, instructive cookbooks go. I'm a true omnivore looking for salad inspiration, and while I will probably use actual pepperoni instead of tofu made to taste like pepperoni, I actually did go out and purchase my first packages of tofu, tempeh, and shirataki noodles. I copied so many of the recipes that I could easily create a recipe section in my personal collection just from this book. If This vegan cookbook belongs at the same level as Thug Kitchen as far as great, inspiring, delicious, creative, instructive cookbooks go. I'm a true omnivore looking for salad inspiration, and while I will probably use actual pepperoni instead of tofu made to taste like pepperoni, I actually did go out and purchase my first packages of tofu, tempeh, and shirataki noodles. I copied so many of the recipes that I could easily create a recipe section in my personal collection just from this book. If I weren't already sold on many of the recipes, there was a chimichurri chickpeas recipe that made me a very happy girl. Because I work in a library, I borrowed it and read it cover to cover, then instantly wanted a copy for myself so I could put sticky notes inside with my comments. It's rare these days that I purchase a cookbook because there aren't that many that have enough recipes I like to make it worthwhile, but this is one of the rare cookbooks that will long sit on my kitchen bookshelf.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Teferet

    This had a lot of great, fun recipes, including my favorite – the dairy-free ranch dressing. Sadly for me, I don’t eat gluten or soy, so a lot of the recipes were a no go. Also, many were a little too complicated for my taste. However, I got a lot of great ideas. This book was especially helpful for dairy-free solutions. I’m sure this would be excellent for vegans. The cashew-ranch dressing gives the book four stars alone! :-)

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    I didn't find this book super helpful though I love salads. It had recipes that were full of exotic and too many ingredients for my everyday life. If I had the money and time for such it might be different.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Abbey

    The book looks nice but I didnt keep any recipes to try. Nothing looked good to me. If you want to make your own dressing from cashews then this is your book.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Joli Hamilton

    Some quite interesting new ideas along with solid instruction for salads I've already made but want my partner to be able to replicate.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Most of the recipes call for ingredients that neither I nor my grocery store have...

  21. 5 out of 5

    Liss Capello

    I wanted a copy of this book based on a friend's rave reviews, and although I noticed it was a vegan cookbook, I remember thinking, 'whatever, they're salads, salads should be NATURALLY VEGAN.' Well, that's something of an oversimplification, isn't it. Not being vegan, I found the approach to certain things (mostly proteins and cream-based dressings) unnecessarily convoluted, and many of these salads make liberal use of ingredients I am unfamiliar with and don't necessarily want to get to know w I wanted a copy of this book based on a friend's rave reviews, and although I noticed it was a vegan cookbook, I remember thinking, 'whatever, they're salads, salads should be NATURALLY VEGAN.' Well, that's something of an oversimplification, isn't it. Not being vegan, I found the approach to certain things (mostly proteins and cream-based dressings) unnecessarily convoluted, and many of these salads make liberal use of ingredients I am unfamiliar with and don't necessarily want to get to know well, such as tofu and tempeh and saitan. However. Despite these potential drawbacks, there is a lot of awesomeness packed in here, and at least a dozen different salads that I'm really looking forward to trying out. I greatly appreciate that the author's angle here is a variety of seasonally-appropriate hearty main-course salads, and although there were a few too many Asian-inspired dishes for my personal taste, I felt like she did a good job of balancing different flavor profiles (there were additionally Mexican-inspired, eastern European-inspired, Indian-inspired, French-inspired, fruit-based, grain-based, and 'steakhouse cuisine-inspired' options, and that's just the ones I can remember offhand). Her instructions were pretty straightforward and I appreciated that she separated out the recipes for a number of her frequently used or only slightly adapted toppings and dressings into beginning sections, referring the reader to them in each instance where they appear instead of writing those recipes out longhand each time. It's a nicely organized book. I did have a few complaints about the food photography in several instances where the plating or preparation of the ingredients didn't really match the directions as given - a recipe calling for whole chopped tomatoes that's photographed with halved cherry tomatoes, for example. On the one hand, it's a salad, it's not a big deal to make these small substitutions (and really, salads are infinitely substitutable). On the other hand, I wanted to see what the recipe as written looked like! Long story short, I enjoyed this book, am glad to own it, and look forward to making my own tasty entree salads soon. Even if I might substitute in real buttermilk ranch and actual bacon. But I might even fry some tofu, who knows. Crazier things have happened.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jocelyn

    i liked the pictures. and the ideas. (or more like, the names : oo! avocado amaranth bhel puri chaat sounds so sexy!) but then, it actually calls for bhel puri and amaranth uhhhhh..... ok? i find those in ... the baking aisle? but that was an extreme recipe. out of the how-ever-many recipes, i probably looked at 5 and thought, "okey doke, romero ... i'll do this" one was pickled grapes one was lentils and one was the dressing (the others were tofu marinades) now ... perhaps i have a crappy blender (this is no i liked the pictures. and the ideas. (or more like, the names : oo! avocado amaranth bhel puri chaat sounds so sexy!) but then, it actually calls for bhel puri and amaranth uhhhhh..... ok? i find those in ... the baking aisle? but that was an extreme recipe. out of the how-ever-many recipes, i probably looked at 5 and thought, "okey doke, romero ... i'll do this" one was pickled grapes one was lentils and one was the dressing (the others were tofu marinades) now ... perhaps i have a crappy blender (this is not a perhaps, i do have a crappy 20 buck blender) but still :: according to romero, the cashew soak method should yield 'creamy dreamy dressing!' and ... it doesn't? perhaps i missed a step in the 'one cup hot water, one cup cashews, soak for 30 minutes, blend' method? the dressing is still tasty and if you're using it to smother millet or couscous, it doesn't matter much if it's a little chunky we still ate it oh and also: how many freaking kinds of kale can a recipe book call for? i get it, this is vegan, so ... it's going to be pretty hipster (what with the agave nectar, liquid smoke, miso, and tamarind in almost every recipe) but seriously? curly - lacinato - russian red ? what about, 'the kale i find in the stop and shop produce section' here's a request : when recipe books call for specialty produce, leave a little note as to why what would be the difference in flavor profile if i just use the first carrot i see? ehh... whatever. as far as everything else : if i have time and ... a far amount of money to invest in updating my pantry to the high-class vegan lifestyle, maybe i would be more inclined? i'd say ... it's worth a flip through. as i said, they are pretty pictures.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kae

    This book is ingenious, why? Because we need more books out there that help us stay away from the boring mundane salads that have perpetuated tables and menus for years. Terry has taken things like Brussels Sprouts and have made them actually seem tasty! Did you know that you can have a Vegan BLT and not feel like you are missing something? These salads are so filling and so creative that you’ll have your friends asking for recipes. Each of these recipes leaves YOU in control of your meals. You This book is ingenious, why? Because we need more books out there that help us stay away from the boring mundane salads that have perpetuated tables and menus for years. Terry has taken things like Brussels Sprouts and have made them actually seem tasty! Did you know that you can have a Vegan BLT and not feel like you are missing something? These salads are so filling and so creative that you’ll have your friends asking for recipes. Each of these recipes leaves YOU in control of your meals. You make the dressing, you prepare your salads, and you have options. We no longer need to rely on a Caesar salad as a ‘different’ option. We can have a salad that is just as good as a pizza, but is vegan and not as fattening. And forget thinking about going to Wendy’s for a Strawberry Fields salad, this book has a salad called ‘Strawberry Spinach Salad with Orange Poppy Seed Dressing’ that sounds and looks much more appetizing (I should know, I work at Wendy’s and make the Strawberry Fields salads). There are salads that utilize blueberries, tempeh, lemongrass, lentils, corn, Kale, and tofu, as well as apples. This book is broken up into sections based on seasons, as well as a section for dressings you can make, and also a small dessert section (which are still in salad form). I normally would not spend my money on a book that is less than 200 pages, but I recommend this book to everyone. If you love salads as much as I do, and are looking to step away from the typical Iceburg Lettuce and Ranch salads, you need this book. You don’t realize what can constitute a salad until you broaden your horizons!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    posted originally at Entertainment Realm [http://entertainmentrealm.com]: Big salads are a major component of my diet. I eat them year round. Usually that’s my dinner. I make great salads. The key is adding as many extras, as much color and variety as possible. So I looked forward to checking out the recipes in Veganomicon co-author Terry Hope Romero’s latest. She divides it by season making it super easy to pick what’s fresh and available. Some yummy, creative salads include Strawberry Spinach S posted originally at Entertainment Realm [http://entertainmentrealm.com]: Big salads are a major component of my diet. I eat them year round. Usually that’s my dinner. I make great salads. The key is adding as many extras, as much color and variety as possible. So I looked forward to checking out the recipes in Veganomicon co-author Terry Hope Romero’s latest. She divides it by season making it super easy to pick what’s fresh and available. Some yummy, creative salads include Strawberry Spinach Salad with Orange Poppy Seed Dressing; Blueberry Tamari Greens Bowl; Asparagus Pad Thai Salad; East-West Roasted Corn Salad; Green Papaya Salad with Lemongrass Tofu; Polish Summer Soba Salad; Pesto Cauliflower & Potato Salad; Grilled Miso Apples & Brussels Sprouts Salad and Almond Falafel Crunch Bowl. Gorgeous pictures, excellent tips and simple instructions included. There’s a section on salad dressings (something I don’t make myself often enough) and a section on salad toppings. In the dressings section, the Creamy Cilantro Lime dressing, Lemon Tahini dressing, Upstate dressing [sundried tomato, nutritional yeast, tahini, apple cider vinegar], the Marvelous Miso dressing are relatively easy and delicious. The toppings section includes ways to prepare croutons, tofu [there’s Ginger Beer Tofu and That 70s Tofu], seitan and lentils to bulk up salads. There’s lots of vegan deliciousness in these pages.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Holly

    Ah, the humble salad. I imagine you’re thinking of a sorry looking pile of wilted lettuce, topped with a few spongy carrots and a thick, calorie-laden dressing, are you not? A salad can be so much more! If you’re ready to take your salads to the next level, Terry Hope Romero offers all kinds of ideas in "Salad Samurai." The book starts off with some delicious, catch-all dressing recipes (such as Back at the Ranch Dressing or Galapagos Islands Dressing), followed by simple side salads and some fun Ah, the humble salad. I imagine you’re thinking of a sorry looking pile of wilted lettuce, topped with a few spongy carrots and a thick, calorie-laden dressing, are you not? A salad can be so much more! If you’re ready to take your salads to the next level, Terry Hope Romero offers all kinds of ideas in "Salad Samurai." The book starts off with some delicious, catch-all dressing recipes (such as Back at the Ranch Dressing or Galapagos Islands Dressing), followed by simple side salads and some fun topping ideas (Coconut Bacony Bits, anyone?!?). The next four chapters feature fabulous main course salads divided by season, making it easy to figure out your next meal based on what’s in season. Try Pepperoni Tempeh Pizza Salad in the summer, or Smokehouse Chickpeas ‘N’ Greens Salad in the fall. Or try one of the delectable creations from the “Sweet & Savory” chapter, such as Coconut Carrot Cake Salad. Along with a plethora of amazing and tempting recipes, Romero has also included a generous helping of the lively wit that her readers adore. Anyone familiar with her past cookbooks won’t be surprised to learn that every recipe in "Salad Samurai" is vegan, but don’t let that scare you away; there’s a recipe in this book for everyone. Review originally published on "San Francisco Book Review."

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Ann

    Warning: this book has a pretty specific audience, and I'm not it. As non vegan (not even vegetarian) who is really just looking to add some interest to what seems to be the most boring part of any meal, this was an enjoyable read. I did find myself thinking: I wish there was meat in this a lot but it is pretty easy to toss in some diced chicken or crumbled bacon. The organization is easy for reference, but I'm not sure leading with lists of just dressings with no pictures was the best choice. U Warning: this book has a pretty specific audience, and I'm not it. As non vegan (not even vegetarian) who is really just looking to add some interest to what seems to be the most boring part of any meal, this was an enjoyable read. I did find myself thinking: I wish there was meat in this a lot but it is pretty easy to toss in some diced chicken or crumbled bacon. The organization is easy for reference, but I'm not sure leading with lists of just dressings with no pictures was the best choice. Using this book requires a lot of flipping back to the preparation sections. The actual salads are organized by season...which I love. I'm always trying to figure out when to make certain dishes to get max flavor and seasonal vegetables. Looks like it is lots of beets for winter :(. I really enjoyed the mix of ingredients offered. There are very few of these that are the bland leaf lettuce with ranch and a tomato that I'm used to seeing and avoiding at restaurants. The pictures look rich and delicious with so much color! the downsides are that many of the recipes involve a lot of dressing and legume/seed prep work

  27. 5 out of 5

    Marathon County Public Library

    This is one creative cookbook chock full of innovative ideas for all kinds of salads, dressings, and toppings. Recipes included building very unique pasta and lettuce salads, packed full with a variety of ingredients. All are vegan, but are sure to please those who don't normally eat that way. There are sweet and savory recipes, like 'Overnight Oats with Mexican Chocolate Creme', as well as salads for every season, including an 'Asparagus Pad Thai Salad' and an 'East-West Roasted Corn Salad'. Th This is one creative cookbook chock full of innovative ideas for all kinds of salads, dressings, and toppings. Recipes included building very unique pasta and lettuce salads, packed full with a variety of ingredients. All are vegan, but are sure to please those who don't normally eat that way. There are sweet and savory recipes, like 'Overnight Oats with Mexican Chocolate Creme', as well as salads for every season, including an 'Asparagus Pad Thai Salad' and an 'East-West Roasted Corn Salad'. The recipes are more labor-intensive with more unique ingredients than I was expecting at first, but I'm sure the results will be worth it! Sarah M. / Marathon County Public Library Find this book in our library catalog.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Veronika

    How much do you love salads? If you are a salad lover this book is for you. This is probably my favourite vegan cookbook. Almost every salad has a picture except for maybe 2-3, which gives you an idea of how it is going to look like. It is a thin book, but there is a lot of variety. The book suggests salads for every season. Every recipe I made from this book was a success. There is always a protein source in the salad. Some of the ingredients might not be familiar to you if your not vegan (ex: How much do you love salads? If you are a salad lover this book is for you. This is probably my favourite vegan cookbook. Almost every salad has a picture except for maybe 2-3, which gives you an idea of how it is going to look like. It is a thin book, but there is a lot of variety. The book suggests salads for every season. Every recipe I made from this book was a success. There is always a protein source in the salad. Some of the ingredients might not be familiar to you if your not vegan (ex: tempeh), but if you do find all of them and follow her instructions the salad will always turn out amazing. Even people who are not vegan loved them when I prepared them. Also, those salads are substitutes for a complete meal and not a side dish, they fill you up, which is quite rare with any salad for me. I definitely love the author and this book!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Dj

    Okay, I really like Salads, and in general I have no real preference for the type. However I am not sure that I will ever make more than two or three of the salads in this book even on a good day. The author seems to be going out of his way to add ingredients that are not generally considered 'salad'. Mostly this book caters to Vegetarians and/or Vegans. Not something that in general is all that much of a turn off, even if I would rather have chicken than anything made from tofu, and I will go f Okay, I really like Salads, and in general I have no real preference for the type. However I am not sure that I will ever make more than two or three of the salads in this book even on a good day. The author seems to be going out of his way to add ingredients that are not generally considered 'salad'. Mostly this book caters to Vegetarians and/or Vegans. Not something that in general is all that much of a turn off, even if I would rather have chicken than anything made from tofu, and I will go for turkey bacon long before I will go for tempura made to think it is bacon. I am sort of an original instrument individual when it comes to food combinations. I don't want it to taste like, I want it to be that. Still if you are going the meat free route take a look, this cook book (?) may be more in your line than mine.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sps

    Romero really, really likes giving things fun/gimmicky names. Actually you can see that tendency even in way-back books like Vegan with a Vengeance. I think I'm less into that than she is, partially because the indexers can't seem to keep up with her. You have to remember what the dish is called in real life (e.g. ranch dressing) plus whatever fanciful name it's given in the book (back at the ranch dressing) because it might not be in the index under both. Luckily the naming thing doesn't interf Romero really, really likes giving things fun/gimmicky names. Actually you can see that tendency even in way-back books like Vegan with a Vengeance. I think I'm less into that than she is, partially because the indexers can't seem to keep up with her. You have to remember what the dish is called in real life (e.g. ranch dressing) plus whatever fanciful name it's given in the book (back at the ranch dressing) because it might not be in the index under both. Luckily the naming thing doesn't interfere with how good the food is.

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