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The Velveteen Rabbit: Complete with Fun, Brain Stretching Word Searches PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: The Velveteen Rabbit: Complete with Fun, Brain Stretching Word Searches
Author: Margery Williams Bianco
Publisher: Published January 3rd 2015 by Dove Cottage (first published 1922)
ISBN: 9780985947194
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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This delightful imprint of the Margery Williams classic included fun brain stretchers - Word Searches focused on Riddles, Rhymes, Characters, Adjectives and Puzzlers. These serve to cement the story, its characters and main themes into the minds of the readers and to teach

30 review for The Velveteen Rabbit: Complete with Fun, Brain Stretching Word Searches

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rachel C.

    Beautiful and deeply touching. At Meredith's wedding last year, her brother and sister read a passage from this book, including the below - an inspired choice. "Real isn't how you are made," said the Skin Horse. "It's a thing that happens to you. When a child loves you for a long, long time, not just to play with, but REALLY loves you, then you become Real." "Does it hurt?" asked the Rabbit. "Sometimes," said the Skin Horse, for he was always truthful. "When you are Real you don't mind being hurt." Beautiful and deeply touching. At Meredith's wedding last year, her brother and sister read a passage from this book, including the below - an inspired choice. "Real isn't how you are made," said the Skin Horse. "It's a thing that happens to you. When a child loves you for a long, long time, not just to play with, but REALLY loves you, then you become Real." "Does it hurt?" asked the Rabbit. "Sometimes," said the Skin Horse, for he was always truthful. "When you are Real you don't mind being hurt." "Does it happen all at once, like being wound up," he asked, "or bit by bit?" "It doesn't happen all at once," said the Skin Horse. "You become. It takes a long time. That's why it doesn't happen often to people who break easily, or have sharp edges, or who have to be carefully kept. Generally, by the time you are Real, most of your hair has been loved off, and your eyes drop out and you get loose in the joints and very shabby. But these things don't matter at all, because once you are Real you can't be ugly, except to people who don't understand."

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    A terrific book, even as an adult, but it gave me quite a scare as a little kid. See, I actually managed to get scarlet fever in the first grade, and because of The Velveteen Rabbit, I was terrified that someone was going to come in and force me to burn all of my toys like the kid in the book had to when he was sick. Thankfully, though, medicine advanced beyond toy burning in between the publishing of this book and 1982, so my G.I. Joes were safe.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Loretta

    What a delightful book! 🐰

  4. 5 out of 5

    Elyse Walters

    I'm sure I wrote a review about this book on this site at one time or another....... The review may be lost ---my memories of this book never are! I own it....... Its a children's favorite! *Thanks Duane --for re-visiting of memories from when you recently read it!

  5. 5 out of 5

    K.D. Absolutely

    The Velveteen Rabbit or How Toys Become Real by Margery Williams Bianco (1881-1944) was originally published in 1922 when she was 41 years old. Tonight is my first time to read this book. Shame on me. It only took 15 mins to read it and at first I was totally not impressed. I thought I already saw the theme of previously-cherished toys being discarded either in favor of a newer or more hi-tech toy or when the child becomes an adult used in Disney/Pixar's movie Toy Story. I also thought I already The Velveteen Rabbit or How Toys Become Real by Margery Williams Bianco (1881-1944) was originally published in 1922 when she was 41 years old. Tonight is my first time to read this book. Shame on me. It only took 15 mins to read it and at first I was totally not impressed. I thought I already saw the theme of previously-cherished toys being discarded either in favor of a newer or more hi-tech toy or when the child becomes an adult used in Disney/Pixar's movie Toy Story. I also thought I already read about the realization of growing old or passing of time used poignantly in E. B. White's Charlotte's Web. However, check the years. Toy Story 1 was shown in 1995 and Charlotte's Web was first published in 1952. Hence, unless there were other children's books with the same themes earlier than 1922, The Velveteen Rabbit was the original. The story is very simple yet it strikes a chord in one's heart. It is about a stuff rabbit toy given to a boy on Christmas Day. Along with other hi-tech and shiny gifts, the little rabbit toy is not a big hit so he is kept in the boy's cabinet. One of them is an old wooden horse who tells the little rabbit that the latter can become real only when he is loved. One night, the boy's nanny cannot find her ward's bed companion toy so she gets the little rabbit. They seem to click so from then on, the boy sleeps with the little rabbit and brings him anywhere he goes. Being a stuff toy, the little rabbit has wear and tear: his color is fading, his hay-filled body is becoming out of shape, he is starting to lose his whiskers, etc. Despite those, the boy still loves him and this makes the little rabbit very happy. However, the boy gets sick with scarlet fever and the doctor orders the boy's parents to burn all his toys. If you check Wikipedia, the vaccine for scarlet fever was only discovered in 1924 (two years after the first publication of Velveteen. Then in 1940, the vaccine was eclipsed by the discovery of penicillin. So, the burning of the toys in 1922 was a sensible order from the doctor. I am not saying though that this book is better than J. M. Barrie's Peter Pan (1902) or Antoine de Saint-Exupery's Le Petite Prince (1945) or even A. A. Milne's Winnie The Pooh (1926). These three novels are far more comprehensive, multi-layered, imaginative and their characters are more memorable. However, the simplicity of The Velveteen Rabbit is its most endearing asset. The vulnerable and trusting little rabbit is much more endearing than the cockiness of Peter, the wisdom of the Little Prince and the cluelessness of Winnie. Don't read the part below if you are not my brother: To my brother who always likes to check if a novel has an allusion to sex, check this book out. The little rabbit is told that being worn out is the consequence of being loved. It does not matter if the little rabbit, because the boy loves him, later becomes out of shape, with faded color, loses its luster, with missing whiskers, etc because he is loved by the boy. Maybe Williams anticipated readers like my brother so she made both characters, the boy and the rabbit, as male ha ha.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Duane

    Shame on you "Toy Story", you knocked off "The Velveteen Rabbit' and didn't even say thank you. Of course this was published in 1922, seventy-three years before Toy Story, so most of today's children haven't read this, which is a shame because it's a sweet story, soft and gentle like the little rabbit.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    First published in 1922, a REAL gem of a classic!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sylvain Reynard

    Some children's books should be read by adults. This is one of them. It examines the transforming power of love.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Agir(آگِر)

    ‘What is REAL?’ asked the Rabbit one day… ‘Real isn’t how you are made,’ said the Skin Horse. It’s a thing that happens to you…’ But these things don’t matter at all, because once you are Real you can’t be ugly

  10. 4 out of 5

    Aryn

    This book scarred me for goddamned life. I still can't get rid of a stuffed animal. Do you have any idea how many stuffed animals live in my basement because of this book?

  11. 5 out of 5

    Terence

    This is my teddy bear: His name is “Teddy” and I have no recollection of getting him, but he has been with me for over 35 years. I can’t say that he and I were (are) as close as the Boy and his Rabbit. I have no memories of sleeping with him nor of fervently clutching him when afraid nor of making ersatz bear dens for his comfort but he was always on the periphery of my life. Lurking on top of my dresser, carelessly tossed on the bed or (today) carefully packed away with a few other childhood tre This is my teddy bear: His name is “Teddy” and I have no recollection of getting him, but he has been with me for over 35 years. I can’t say that he and I were (are) as close as the Boy and his Rabbit. I have no memories of sleeping with him nor of fervently clutching him when afraid nor of making ersatz bear dens for his comfort but he was always on the periphery of my life. Lurking on top of my dresser, carelessly tossed on the bed or (today) carefully packed away with a few other childhood treasures. And the idea of throwing him away or giving him to the Salvation Army is so fundamentally wrong that my stomach twists in dismay and I know – I know , even though I’m an atheist – that I will spend eternity in Hell if I ever do so. My friend at work has occasionally recommended this book to me as it’s one of her favorites. This is the same woman who got me the novelization of the movie J.T. for Christmas one year. I watched J.T. in the second grade, and I refuse to read the book because that experience so affected me that I don’t want to relive it. She also recommended the first Transformers movie. So you can see that I was wary about The Velveteen Rabbit but I was finally moved to read it by a chance reference in an essay I read in the October 29, 2012 issue The Nation, the following quote: “What is REAL?” asked the Rabbit one day…. “You become. It takes a long time. That’s why it doesn’t happen often to people who break easily, or have sharp edges, or who have to be carefully kept. Generally, by the time you are Real, most of your hair has been loved off, and your eyes drop out and you get loose in the joints and very shabby…. But once you are Real you can’t become unreal again. It lasts for always.” That observation resonated and I downloaded the eBook from the Project Gutenberg site. This is a marvelous story and I can easily identify with the Boy (and there’s a happy ending, unlike J.T.), and it’s going on my Christmas list for my youngest niece, who’s six.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Maggie Campbell

    "It doesn't happen all at once. You become. It takes a long time. That's why it doesn't happen often to people who break easily, or have sharp edges, or who have to be carefully kept. Generally, by the time you are Real, most of your hair has been loved off, and your eyes drop out and you get loose in your joints and very shabby. But these things don't matter at all, because once you are Real, you can't be ugly, except to people who don't understand."

  13. 4 out of 5

    Emily May

    What a beautiful and touching story. I was truly blown away by it's originality and subtle message... there is nothing much else to say: it is a heartbreaking story. I cried and cried and just wanted the opportunity to love the Velveteen rabbit forever.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Wendy Darling

    My favorite book of all time . . . .with timeless themes of love and loss. If you've never heard Meryl Streep pitch-perfect reading of this book, or seen David Jorgensen's beautiful drawings, you've never really experienced it properly.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Audrey

    Such a beautiful beautiful story. During my second year of teaching, I started taking 30 minutes or so on Fridays to read a children's story to my juniors, and then we'd discuss it in the context of a shared letters project that was ongoing through the year. It never failed that I would cry every time I read this story -- the whole concept of being real as it is explained in the book just moves me so much. When you are shabby and well-worn and your whiskers are rubbed off and your fur is patchy, Such a beautiful beautiful story. During my second year of teaching, I started taking 30 minutes or so on Fridays to read a children's story to my juniors, and then we'd discuss it in the context of a shared letters project that was ongoing through the year. It never failed that I would cry every time I read this story -- the whole concept of being real as it is explained in the book just moves me so much. When you are shabby and well-worn and your whiskers are rubbed off and your fur is patchy, that means you are loved and that is what real is -- what an amazing truth. We had wonderful talks about appearance and personality and being who you are with this book -- it's applicable to every age.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Melki

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ronyell

    “The Velveteen Rabbit” is Rabbit Ears’ first classic story that is based off of Margery Williams’ popular tale and it is about how a toy rabbit learns the true meaning of being real. With Meryl Streep’s tender narration, George Winston’s soft music and David Jorgensen’s beautiful illustrations, “The Velveteen Rabbit” is an instant classic that children will watch over and over again. What made this video truly memorable was Meryl Streep’s tender and soothing narration. Meryl Streep gives the st “The Velveteen Rabbit” is Rabbit Ears’ first classic story that is based off of Margery Williams’ popular tale and it is about how a toy rabbit learns the true meaning of being real. With Meryl Streep’s tender narration, George Winston’s soft music and David Jorgensen’s beautiful illustrations, “The Velveteen Rabbit” is an instant classic that children will watch over and over again. What made this video truly memorable was Meryl Streep’s tender and soothing narration. Meryl Streep gives the story a very subtle mood by narrating in a graceful and soft-spoken tone that many children will be mesmerized by her narration. Meryl Streep has also done a brilliant job at expressing the various emotions that each of the characters experience throughout the story. The scene where I think that Meryl Streep’s narration stood out the most was the scene where the real rabbits tell the Velveteen Rabbit that he is not real and the Velveteen Rabbit begins to cry and Meryl Streep actually sounds like she is about to cry in this scene which truly brought out the realism of the situation in this scene. George Winston’s piano solo music is extremely beautiful and engaging, as his music is both happy and sorrowful, depending on the scene. The scene where I think that George Winston’s musical abilities truly shine was the scene where one of the real rabbits was dancing in front of the Velveteen Rabbit and George Winston plays the piano in such a dramatic and fast paced tone that I found myself loving every second of that scene. The video’s true highlight is David Jorgensen’s illustrations as they are extremely beautiful and captivating. David Jorgensen makes all the characters look extremely realistic, which gives the story a sense of realism and the images that stood out the most to me were the images of the real rabbits, as they look realistic and beautiful. “The Velveteen Rabbit” is a beautiful story about knowing the importance of true love and children will easily relate to this story as they will feel sympathy for the Velveteen Rabbit trying to find the true meaning of being real. I would recommend this book to children ages five and up since small children might be upset at the fact that the Velveteen Rabbit feels upset when he realizes he is not like the other real rabbits. For more Rabbit Ears titles, check out: The Fool and the Flying Ship John Henry How the Rhinoceros Got His Skin Princess Scargo and the Birthday Pumpkin: The Native American Legend Peachboy: A Japanese Folktale Pinocchio This story is also available on DVD through the Rabbit Ears Website and Amazon. Review is also on: Rabbit Ears Book Blog

  18. 5 out of 5

    Tisha

    It's one of my hobbies to read the books which come up in movies or tv series. I don't know why it makes me happy! So, for this one, I have to thank Chandler Bing from FRIENDS! :D I totally loved this book! It reminded me of 'Toy Story' though, my all time favorite animated film! Awwww, the velveteen rabbit! My eyes were almost teary until the fairy came! :'( Beautiful book with some beautiful writings! ^_^

  19. 5 out of 5

    Pramod Nair

    There was once a velveteen rabbit, and in the beginning he was really splendid. He was fat and bunchy, as a rabbit should be; his coat was spotted brown and white, he had real thread whiskers, and his ears were lined with pink sateen. On Christmas morning, when he sat wedged in the top of the Boy's stocking, with a sprig of holly between his paws, the effect was charming. Originally published in 1922, The Velveteen Rabbit (or How Toys Become Real) is a classic children’s story by the English-A There was once a velveteen rabbit, and in the beginning he was really splendid. He was fat and bunchy, as a rabbit should be; his coat was spotted brown and white, he had real thread whiskers, and his ears were lined with pink sateen. On Christmas morning, when he sat wedged in the top of the Boy's stocking, with a sprig of holly between his paws, the effect was charming. Originally published in 1922, The Velveteen Rabbit (or How Toys Become Real) is a classic children’s story by the English-American writer Margery Williams Bianco. A beautiful story with deep insights in to life, relations and what it means to be real, ‘The Velveteen Rabbit’ can make even adult readers feel emotional. The story of the toy rabbit who longed to be real On a Christmas day, a boy gets a cute velveteen rabbit as a gift. It was a simple but beautiful toy, made out of velveteen. The boy received so many presents that Christmas, and after a brief instance of attraction, the boy forgets about the rabbit. The boy plays with more expensive toys, while the rabbit is left in the boy’s nursery all forgotten for a period of time. A lovely illustration by William Nicholson, a British painter and illustrator, from the 1922 Heinemann Edition of ‘The Velveteen Rabbit’. The other toys, the more expensive and more complex, mechanical one’s, in the boy’s nursery, snubs the velveteen rabbit because he was a simple toy made out of cloth and stuffed sawdust. He was not expensive or he was not sophisticated like the mechanical toys, who thought themselves as superior and looked down upon other toys with disdain. They pretended they were REAL. The velveteen rabbit, who was so humble and simple, didn’t even knew there were real rabbits in the world, and thought that everything had sawdust stuffing inside. The derisive comments from the other toys made him feel so insignificant and commonplace. The only toy to be kind to him was the skin horse, the oldest toy in the boy’s nursery. He was shabby in appearance with bald patches on his skin, and he was a long used and long loved toy. The skin horse, who was wise and experienced, tells the rabbit about nursery magic and how the love from their young owners can transform toys into real. The scene where the skin horse explains the velveteen rabbit about ‘what is real’ is a fine example of the power that Margery Williams conjures up through simple words. " Real isn't how you are made, " said the Skin Horse. " It's a thing that happens to you. When a child loves you for a long, long time, not just to play with, but REALLY loves you, then you become Real. " " Does it hurt? " asked the Rabbit. " Sometimes, " said the Skin Horse, for he was always truthful. " When you are Real you don't mind being hurt. " " Does it happen all at once, like being wound up, " he asked, " or bit by bit? " "It doesn't happen all at once, " said the Skin Horse. " You become. It takes a long time. That's why it doesn't happen often to people who break easily, or have sharp edges, or who have to be carefully kept. Generally, by the time you are Real, most of your hair has been loved off, and your eyes drop out and you get loose in the joints and very shabby. But these things don't matter at all, because once you are Real you can't be ugly, except to people who don't understand. " The velveteen rabbit was so smitten by the notion of nursery magic that he longed to become real. A chance incident brings the velveteen rabbit and the boy together and soon the rabbit becomes the boy’s most loved toy and best friend. The happy moments that the rabbit spends playing with the boy, becomes the most precious thing for him. The rest of the story melancholically narrates how the nursery magic happens for the velveteen rabbit. The story of the velveteen rabbit will show young readers how a person becomes real – the magical transformation of the toys into real within the story - through love and insight gained over ages. While reading the story, young readers will come across the concepts of loss and sadness, and will learn that both happiness and sadness are all part of our life. The narrations, of unconditional love from the boy towards his favorite toy, the velveteen rabbit, the descriptions of rabbit’s adoration of the boy, and the sentiments that happen to the rabbit because of his longing to become real, are powerful enough to make the reader choke with emotions. The story tells us how plain unconditional love can allow one to surpass the feelings of ridicule, abandonment, sadness and rejection from others. This is a perfect children’s book that is suitable for a parent-child read-along session and is highly recommended even for adult readers.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ammara Abid

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sloan

    This is by far my favorite book from childhood. My mother read it to me countless times. I really can’t express what this tiny book means to me. It brings me to tears every time I read it. It also makes me pull out my own version of "a velveteen rabbit," which is a little gray bear that I have had since the day I was born. It's funny but when I pull that bear out and hold him in my arms it brings a rush of comfort and a feeling that everything is right. This story is a classic that should be rea This is by far my favorite book from childhood. My mother read it to me countless times. I really can’t express what this tiny book means to me. It brings me to tears every time I read it. It also makes me pull out my own version of "a velveteen rabbit," which is a little gray bear that I have had since the day I was born. It's funny but when I pull that bear out and hold him in my arms it brings a rush of comfort and a feeling that everything is right. This story is a classic that should be read to all children. I look forward to the day when I can read it to my own.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Paul Nash

    Didn't everyone read this as a child? I sure did and I made my mom read it over and over. I saw a post of this today and was like, "holy shit! I forgot all about this book"... So here is my small review on such a wonderful children's book! 5 stars

  23. 5 out of 5

    Shirley Revill

    My children and grandchildren loved this book and I must admit I loved it too. A wonderful classic children's story. Recommended.

  24. 5 out of 5

    booklady

    I've lost track of all the times I've read this wonderful sweet story. But my favorite was when I copied and sent the following portion of it to my very REAL mom in a birthday card/letter to let her know how much she is loved:“What is REAL?” asked the Velveteen Rabbit one day... “Does it mean having things that buzz inside you and a stick-out handle?” “Real isn't how you are made,” said the Skin Horse. “It's a thing that happens to you. When [someone] loves you for a long, long time, not just to I've lost track of all the times I've read this wonderful sweet story. But my favorite was when I copied and sent the following portion of it to my very REAL mom in a birthday card/letter to let her know how much she is loved:“What is REAL?” asked the Velveteen Rabbit one day... “Does it mean having things that buzz inside you and a stick-out handle?” “Real isn't how you are made,” said the Skin Horse. “It's a thing that happens to you. When [someone] loves you for a long, long time, not just to play with, but REALLY loves you, then you become Real.” “Does it hurt?” asked the Rabbit. “Sometimes,” said the Skin Horse, for he was always truthful. “When you are Real you don't mind being hurt.” “Does it happen all at once, like being wound up,” he asked, “or bit by bit?” “It doesn't happen all at once,” said the Skin Horse. “You become. It takes a long time. That's why it doesn't often happen to people who break easily, or have sharp edges, or who have to be carefully kept.” “Generally, by the time you are Real, most of your hair has been loved off, and your eyes drop out and you get loose in the joints and very shabby. But these things don't matter at all, because once you are Real you can't be ugly, except to people who don't understand... once you are Real you can't become unreal again. It lasts for always.”Deep sigh.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Bob

    I don't think I've ever read this before and it was ever read to me as a child I don't remember it. This is another great book in my search for good reading and stories for my grandchildren.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jon(athan) Nakapalau

    One of the earliest books I can remember...special place on my "childhood shelf."

  27. 5 out of 5

    Manybooks

    A simple but profound story of how one small toy velveteen rabbit becomes "real" (through so-called nursery magic and because the velveteen rabbit is perceived as being real by the young boy who sleeps with it every night and plays with it every day), but I do have to admit that I am actually more than a bit glad I did NOT encounter Margery Williams Bianco's classic as a very young child (for I did indeed and very much akin to the Boy have a stuffed rabbit toy that was in many ways exactly the s A simple but profound story of how one small toy velveteen rabbit becomes "real" (through so-called nursery magic and because the velveteen rabbit is perceived as being real by the young boy who sleeps with it every night and plays with it every day), but I do have to admit that I am actually more than a bit glad I did NOT encounter Margery Williams Bianco's classic as a very young child (for I did indeed and very much akin to the Boy have a stuffed rabbit toy that was in many ways exactly the same kind of constant companion as is featured in the Velveteen Rabbit and quite frankly, I am rather sure I would have majorly freaked out at the scene where the doctor orders all of the Boy's books and toys, including his velveteen rabbit, to be burned because of the scarlet fever infection risk, with the fact of the physician more than likely being right with regard to the need to sanitise and disinfect the Boy's bedroom, including getting rid of certain very much contaminated and germ-ridden toys and books quite notwithstanding). And also, really, and with my apologies to those of you who consider The Velveteen Rabbit a total childhood favourite, reading it always makes me (on a personal and emotional level) feel rather frustrated with and even a bit angry at the Boy. For if this had been MY toy rabbit, I absolutely and definitely would have at least verbally and with angry tears rebelled and loudly complained at having my toys and books (and especially my favourite stuffed animal) burned (even if ordered by the doctor, even if for legitimate and realistic reasons, and truth be told, although as an adult, I do understand and appreciate why the doctor feels that the Boy's scarlet fever exposed books and toys need to be destroyed in order to keep potential reinfection at bay, I have still always despised the doctor's rather callous attitude and words, for they just seem so very cold and careless, they seem to consider the velveteen rabbit that is supposed to be burned as just some random and unimportant toy). But then again, even the Boy himself seems rather nonchalant at best towards what is happening, being described by Margery Williams Bianco as considerably more excited about and hankering after his promised recuperative trip to the seashore than in any way being sad or angry at the doctor having ordered his treasured toys and books, including his constant velveteen rabbit companion, to be incinerated. And to and for me, the ending of The Velveteen Rabbit (with the toy rabbit actually being turned by the fairy into a real, into a bona fide bunny rabbit) is therefore and actually in many ways really quite massively bittersweet and even a bit painful. For the stuffed rabbit was totally and utterly real to the Boy because he considered his velveteen rabbit as real, he perceived it as being a true rabbit and a true friend, but in some ways (at least in my opinion), that very magical type of reality seems to kind of leave and disappear at the end, when the Boy just and simply accepts with not even one word of complaint and protest the doctor's orders that his toys must be destroyed, that even his special rabbit toy must be burned (and while I am well aware of the fact that I am more than likely imposing my own personal feelings here, I do stand by how I have always felt reading The Velveteen Rabbit, and that the Boy just calmly, without protest seems to accept his stuffed rabbit toy needing to be burned, this has indeed and in fact always somewhat majorly chafed and has also therefore generally left me a bit uncomfortable and unsatisfied with regard to Margery Williams' Bianco's The Velveteen Rabbit).

  28. 5 out of 5

    Simin Yadegar

    خرگوش مخملی پرسید واقعی بودن یعنی چی ؟ اسب دانا جواب داد وقتی کسی خیلی دوستت داشته باشد واقعی میشوی .....از متن کتاب

  29. 5 out of 5

    Hilary

    Beautiful illustrations and a wonderful story about how toys become real when you love them enough, we knew that of course but we suspect some might not realise this so it has a very important message. There are some sad bits and it was hard to read aloud in places, but a happy ending!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mia Bakhthiar

    IT'S MIDNIGHT AND I AM SOBBING DON'T TOUCH ME

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