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The Tale of Peter Rabbit Designer Edition PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: The Tale of Peter Rabbit Designer Edition
Author: Beatrix Potter
Publisher: Published September 27th 2016 by Frederick Warne (first published December 16th 1901)
ISBN: 9780241280409
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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The Tale of Peter Rabbit was first published by Frederick Warne in 1902 and endures as Beatrix Potter's most popular and well-loved tale. It tells the story of a very mischievous rabbit and the trouble he encounters in Mr McGregor's vegetable garden! The Tale of Peter Rabbit is part of a collection of five books designed by iconic British fashion designers to celebrate the The Tale of Peter Rabbit was first published by Frederick Warne in 1902 and endures as Beatrix Potter's most popular and well-loved tale. It tells the story of a very mischievous rabbit and the trouble he encounters in Mr McGregor's vegetable garden! The Tale of Peter Rabbit is part of a collection of five books designed by iconic British fashion designers to celebrate the 150th anniversary of Beatrix Potter.

30 review for The Tale of Peter Rabbit Designer Edition

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bionic Jean

    The Tale of Peter Rabbit is the first in a series of delightful children's books by Beatrix Potter. There are twenty-three of these “little Tales” about woodland animals (who are, of course, little people in disguise, as they wear clothes and behave exactly as their human counterparts would). This first tale about a mischievous little rabbit called Peter, is perhaps the most famous of all. Unlike some of the others, it does not seem to have dated much at all. Most children today will recognise a The Tale of Peter Rabbit is the first in a series of delightful children's books by Beatrix Potter. There are twenty-three of these “little Tales” about woodland animals (who are, of course, little people in disguise, as they wear clothes and behave exactly as their human counterparts would). This first tale about a mischievous little rabbit called Peter, is perhaps the most famous of all. Unlike some of the others, it does not seem to have dated much at all. Most children today will recognise all the little animals, and the vegetable garden setting is timeless. Peter lives with his mother and three other siblings, Flopsy, Mopsy and Cotton-tail. Their home is under the roots of a tree, but they are allowed to play anywhere ... except Mr. McGregor's garden, "Your father had an accident there; he was put into a pie by Mrs McGregor," warns Peter's mother. Of course Peter knows better. The prospect of a ready-made larder of fresh vegetables is far too tempting for such a naughty little rabbit to heed any silly warnings. As soon as he can he scoots off to do exactly the opposite of what he has been told. I won't reveal his adventures, for fear of spoilers, but it is an exciting tale, with a very real threat to our hero at its core. And it does all end happily, with a valuable lesson being learnt by Peter. We even pick up some interesting traditional herbal remedies along the way, such as parsley being good for nausea, and camomile tea for stomach upsets. It is a charming story, introducing not only Peter Rabbit, but also his siblings, Flopsy, Mopsy and Cottontail. There's even a mention in this first book of Peter's cousin, Benjamin Bunny. It also has a moral aspect, as of course Peter wouldn't have been so much at risk - or so frightened - if he had done what he was told to do in the first place. Plus he might have enjoyed his supper a bit more! The character of "Peter Rabbit" was inspired by a pet rabbit the author had had as a child, whom she had named "Peter Piper". In 1893, Beatrix Potter had sent an illustrated letter to five-year-old Noel Moore, the son of her former governess Annie Carter Moore. It featured "Peter Rabbit". Annie Moore recognised the potential in this and other "story letters" her former pupil had sent, and suggested that Beatrix tried to get them published. However, it did not prove to be so easy. She sent the manuscript to six publishers, all of whom rejected it. Eventually Beatrix Potter published the book privately in 1901. The Tale of Peter Rabbit was eventually accepted for commercial publication by the London firm of Frederick Warne & Co. in 1902. It was an instant success and multiple reprints were issued in the years immediately following. To date it has been translated into 36 languages, has sold 45 million copies and is one of the best-selling children's stories of all time. Frederick Warne & Co. went on to publish all twenty-three stories. They have never lost their popularity. Today more than two million Beatrix Potter books are sold every year worldwide; incredibly, this is four books every minute! Unfortunately for Beatrix Potter the copyright of The Tale of Peter Rabbit was never registered in the United States. Unlicensed copies of The Tale of Peter Rabbit soon began to appear, and there was no way to stop them. Beatrix Potter of course received no royalties from any of these. She only began to realise how enormous the financial loss might be after the publication of her second book, "The Tale of Squirrel Nutkin" when her father brought home a toy squirrel labelled "Nutkin" in the Christmas of 1903. It proved to be a wake-up call. From that point Beatrix Potter decided to be responsible for the production of merchandise relating to her books. She patented a "Peter Rabbit" doll in 1903 and followed it almost immediately with a "Peter Rabbit" board game. Since then products have been developed for both children and adults. Now we see the "Peter Rabbit" brand on toys, dishes, foods, clothing and recordings as well as books of various types. Before these whimsical stories ever came to light, Beatrix Potter had been a respected watercolourist, illustrating plant life, insects, fossils and various archaeological artefacts, as well as the pets and small animals she had always painted, even as a child. She came from a wealthy family and had been privately educated at home, so had perhaps been given more time to pursue her unique interests and talents than many of her peers. She was almost thirty when The Tale of Peter Rabbit was first published commercially. She had become engaged to her editor, Norman Warne, but tragically he died a month later and she was not to actually marry until many years later, when she married a solicitor at the age of 47. The books are designed to appeal to young children. Their format goes against the stereotype; they are miniatures rather than huge picture books. But little children love little things, which seem to be scaled down just for them. They will love to hold these and pretend to read, although they will need help with the story. When Beatrix Potter died in 1943, she left nearly all her considerable property to the National Trust. Coming from a family with money, and achieving such fame and recognition herself, with her popular books, plus the associated merchandise, she was able to become a land-owner. She spent her entire adult life buying up bits of the Lake District area (now Cumbria) which she so loved. It was the largest gift to the National Trust which had ever been made. It included her 17th Century farmhouse "Hill Top Farm", which many enthusiastic readers now visit today. It also took in over 4,000 acres of land, sixteen farms, cottages and herds of cattle and Herdwick sheep! (She was a keen sheep farmer herself.) So we have a dual legacy. Yes, we have her wonderfully whimsical books. But perhaps not many people realise, as they climb the beautiful fells (hills) of the Lake Dictrict, that the freedom to do this is almost entirely because of Beatrix Potter's love of the natural world, her ecological views, foresight and generosity. We used to visit the Lake District every year, to try some of the more gentle climbs up the fells. We stayed in a guest house in Near Sawrey. Just along the road is another little village called Far Sawrey, where we sometimes visited Beatrix Potter's house "Hill Top". Her furnishings are still there and much of her memorabilia. As I wandered around the gardens once, I noticed a vegetable patch. I saw carrots, lettuces and radishes, all growing in neat rows exactly as if Mr. McGregor had just popped inside for a moment. And out of the corner of my eye, did I spy a glimpse of two bright little eyes in a furry face peeping at me from under a cabbage leaf? Or was it perhaps just my imagination?

  2. 5 out of 5

    Michael Finocchiaro

    All of the Beatrix Potter stories are wonderful but this little one of this mischievous little rabbit who is naughty! So cute, and a great introduction to the beautiful world that Potter created. I think that this may be my favourite one actually. And naturally, my kids LOVED it when they were younger.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ahmed Ejaz

    This story reminds me my childhood. I still remember I used to do things from which my mama forbades me. Just like Peter rabbit. Her mother tells him not to go to Mr. McGregor's farm. But as he is a naughty rabbit, He still goes and faces troubles. I liked the names of four rabbits: Flopsy, Mopsy, Cotton-tail, and Peter. Aren't they cute? Especially first two. (^_^) March 3, 2017

  4. 4 out of 5

    Duane

    Peter Rabbit almost finds himself in a Mrs. McGregor's pie, just like his father.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Manny

    Inspired by Ramblefoot , a gritty, naturalistic, no-holds-barred depiction of the lives of wolves, I couldn't help wondering if similar treatments weren't possible for other classics. Here's an extract from my draft rabbit novel, provisionally entitled Nojacket:Peter finished his breakfast, but the insipid, cloying taste of the dead dandelion leaves left him unsatisfied. The craving was starting to build up in him again. He needed to veg out. Suddenly, he started as a voice came from right behi Inspired by Ramblefoot , a gritty, naturalistic, no-holds-barred depiction of the lives of wolves, I couldn't help wondering if similar treatments weren't possible for other classics. Here's an extract from my draft rabbit novel, provisionally entitled Nojacket:Peter finished his breakfast, but the insipid, cloying taste of the dead dandelion leaves left him unsatisfied. The craving was starting to build up in him again. He needed to veg out. Suddenly, he started as a voice came from right behind him. "We're looking for blackberries. You want to come, Peter?" It was his half-sister Flopsy, a precociously formed doe. She was not yet one summer old, yet already her haunches had the rounded look of a mature female. She exuded an enticing, musky odor. As if by chance, she turned her head so that their whiskers brushed, and seductively twitched her nose. For a moment, Peter was tempted, but the other urge was too strong. "Sorry, Flopsy. I've got... stuff to do." With one bound, he had scooped up his blue jacket, the mark of the civilized young rabbit, and was out of the burrow before he could change his mind. He lolloped down the path as he had done many times before, then, looking both ways, he eased his trembling body under the hard wood of the gate. He was on McGregor territory. He straightened up, all his senses maximally alert, but there were no warning signals yet. With the practiced ease of the professional thief, he took the short-cut through the gooseberry bushes and emerged directly in the vegetable garden. His eyes glistened with desire as he saw the huge, plump lettuces. No longer caring about safety, he immediately attacked the nearest one, slicing into it with his razor-sharp front teeth. Green juices ran down his chin as he gorged himself on the unresisting leaves. His eyes half-closed, he chewed, swallowed, bit again, forcing the food down his throat as fast as he could eat until he reached the tender heart. In less time than one could believe possible, the lettuce was no more than an eviscerated husk. Peter contemptuously tossed away the bitter stem and then started on the radishes. Their tart, peppery red flesh contrasted delightfully with the sweet lettuce, and he frenziedly ate one after another. His swollen stomach hurt, but the pleasure was still stronger.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Isa Lavinia

    'Now my dears,' said old Mrs. Rabbit one morning, 'you may go into the fields or down the lane, but don't go into Mr. McGregor's garden: your Father had an accident there; he was put in a pie by Mrs. McGregor.' ( º_º ) (⊙︿⊙)

  7. 5 out of 5

    Adita ✨The Slumbering Insomniac✨

    ★★★★★★★★☆☆[8/10] Legendary names- ✅ Flopsy aka good kid ✅ Mopsy aka good kid ✅ Cotton-tail aka good kid ✅ Peter Peter the Urchin aka Hot-headed Kid aka SOS-sending, always-in-a-pickle kid.  

  8. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Anze

    Flopsy, Mopsy, Cottontail and Peter Rabbit are allowed to explore but are warned by their mother that they are not to go into Mr. McGregor's garden. All but Peter Rabbit heed her advice for that is the first place he chooses to explore. Once Mr. McGregor spots Peter, a chase ensues. Oh, what a naughty rabbit! This is the first time I have read a Beatrix Potter book. What a cute and adorable gem this is. The illustrations compliment the print beautifully. Given that I read quite a bit of historica Flopsy, Mopsy, Cottontail and Peter Rabbit are allowed to explore but are warned by their mother that they are not to go into Mr. McGregor's garden. All but Peter Rabbit heed her advice for that is the first place he chooses to explore. Once Mr. McGregor spots Peter, a chase ensues. Oh, what a naughty rabbit! This is the first time I have read a Beatrix Potter book. What a cute and adorable gem this is. The illustrations compliment the print beautifully. Given that I read quite a bit of historical fiction, this is a nice break for me. In addition to teaching a valuable lesson, this book is also amusing. Its difficult not to smile while reading the names Flopsy and Mopsy. Its no wonder that Potter is among the best authors of chidren's books. This woman has quite an impressive resume. Aside from author, she was a mycologist, an illustrator and a conservationist. A really lovely book overall.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sabera

    One of the first books I remember being bought as a child was The Tale of Peter Rabbit and having read it many times it has become a favourite! It tells the story of a mischievous rabbit who, against his mother’s advice, decides to venture into Mr McGregor’s Garden. Peter eats his way through a variety of foods in Mr McGregor’s garden before he is caught by the farmer and what ensue are his attempts to escape from the garden! The story carries a strong theme of the consequences of not following i One of the first books I remember being bought as a child was The Tale of Peter Rabbit and having read it many times it has become a favourite! It tells the story of a mischievous rabbit who, against his mother’s advice, decides to venture into Mr McGregor’s Garden. Peter eats his way through a variety of foods in Mr McGregor’s garden before he is caught by the farmer and what ensue are his attempts to escape from the garden! The story carries a strong theme of the consequences of not following instructions and would be ideal to use within a year two or even year three classroom. It is also a good book to use for activities such as Hot Seating, particularly to get children to think about how various characters, such as Peter or Mr McGregor may be feeling. As well as this, children could carry out drama/role play activities to re-tell the story, write diary entries from different characters' points of view and even have circle time sessions to discuss the consequences of not following instructions.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Tara

    Why do we read certain children's books—and remember them all the days of our lives? I know for me...there is something about the sweet, safe, cozy place, that these classic books occupy in memory, short term - and long term memory, for I can truly declare that I have recalled the lines of Beatrix Potter at many times in my life, high school mid terms, college finals, marriage vows (yep!) and I now deeply know that the simple perfect truths bestowed in these adorable books, whether in rhyme or no Why do we read certain children's books—and remember them all the days of our lives? I know for me...there is something about the sweet, safe, cozy place, that these classic books occupy in memory, short term - and long term memory, for I can truly declare that I have recalled the lines of Beatrix Potter at many times in my life, high school mid terms, college finals, marriage vows (yep!) and I now deeply know that the simple perfect truths bestowed in these adorable books, whether in rhyme or not; sunk deep into my psyche. Consider the following... "Once upon a time there were four little Rabbits, and their names were— Flopsy, Mopsy, Cotton-tail, and Peter. They lived with their Mother in a sand-bank, underneath the root of a very big fir-tree. 'Now my dears,' said old Mrs. Rabbit one morning, 'you may go into the fields or down the lane, but don't go into Mr. McGregor's garden: your Father had an accident there; he was put in a pie by Mrs. McGregor.'" I could almost see the pie crust being rolled out! No, no, no. Mr. McGregor was NOT to be messed with. Or any adult for that matter—it was best to adhere to simple truths and sensible ways of life. Peter was a wondrous creation by the legendary Beatrix Potter, who truly holds the title to first female publisher, for she, an aristocrat who preferred nature and simple living amongst God's creatures and the rolling greenlands of her beloved English lake country...published her little rabbit book - by herself - in 1901, much to the chagrin of her social climbing mother. I say - bravo - brave lady, and I read her brilliant little books of farm life at its absolute perfection and I smile and say yes, this is the natural magic that lives inside a children's book, albeit one you can hold in the palm of your hand, cozy and safe :) Simple, true, accessible, real. Hats off to Beatrix Potter!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Nandakishore Varma

    After reading Traveller's review of The Tale of Mrs. Tiggy-Winkle, I remembered that this book was the first ever children's book I read - in translation (Peter was called "Chinnan"). There was a much-loved poem I used to recite (I still remember it!) അരുതെനനമമ പറഞഞിടടും വികൃതികള കാടടിയ ചിനനനന പെരുതായമളി പിണഞഞൊരു ചരിതം കേളകകൂ കുടടികളേ! (Children! Listen to the story of Chinnan, who despite his mother's advice, did a lot of mischief and got into big trouble!) This poem is not there in the original, BTW After reading Traveller's review of The Tale of Mrs. Tiggy-Winkle, I remembered that this book was the first ever children's book I read - in translation (Peter was called "Chinnan"). There was a much-loved poem I used to recite (I still remember it!) അരുതെന്നമ്മ പറഞ്ഞിട്ടും വികൃതികള്‍ കാട്ടിയ ചിന്നന്ന് പെരുതായമളി പിണഞ്ഞൊരു ചരിതം കേള്‍ക്കൂ കുട്ടികളേ! (Children! Listen to the story of Chinnan, who despite his mother's advice, did a lot of mischief and got into big trouble!) This poem is not there in the original, BTW. The book was loved so intensely that it practically fell apart due to frequent perusal: it was consigned sadly to the chest of childhood memories. Imagine my delight, then, when I encountered Peter again in his true avatar at The Beatrix Potter Exhibition. I immediately bought a copy of the book for my son - or maybe, for me...

  12. 5 out of 5

    Knarik Avetisyan

    This identification dramatically instills fear and tension in the reader, and interacts with the frequently distanced voice of the verbal narrative, sometimes with contradictory effects. To me Potter is inconsistent in the use of contradictory effects in the word-picture interaction. For example, in the illustration of Peter standing by the locked door, the verbal narrative describes the scene without the flippancy evident in the moment of the sieve. The inability to overcome obstacles is present This identification dramatically instills fear and tension in the reader, and interacts with the frequently distanced voice of the verbal narrative, sometimes with contradictory effects. To me Potter is inconsistent in the use of contradictory effects in the word-picture interaction. For example, in the illustration of Peter standing by the locked door, the verbal narrative describes the scene without the flippancy evident in the moment of the sieve. The inability to overcome obstacles is presented in the verbal narrative with objective matter-of-factness and the statement, “Peter began to cry” is offered without irony or attitude, thus drawing the reader closer to Peter’s emotions and plight. The illustration depicts an unclothed Peter standing upright against the door, one foot upon the other with a tear running from his eye. Without his clothes, Peter is only a small, wild animal but his tears, his emotions, and his human posture intensifies the reader’s identification with him. Here, verbal narrative and illustration work in harmony rather than in disharmony. Potter subverts not only her age’s expectations of what it takes to be a good child but subverts the hero genre with its young, objective, rational, resourceful white male who leaves the civilized world to brave obstacles and opponents in the wilderness, and, once his goal is achieved, returns home to grateful welcome and rewards. Peter is quite unlike the traditional hero because "he is small, emotionally driven, easily frightened, and a not very rational animal". She suggests Potter’s tale has encouraged many generations of children to “self-indulgence, disobedience, transgression of social boundaries and ethics, and assertion of their wild, unpredictable nature against the constrictions of civilized living.” One day, I'll read them to my kids and I'm sure, they'll enjoy it!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    So I think Manny and Beth-Ann have it spot on. Peter Rabbit dies in this book, and his escape is a moment-of-death fantasy. Peter is the Peyton Farquhar of kids books. Farquhar, for those who don't remember, is the Alabama Confederate (gentleman farmer / non-combatant) from Ambrose Bierce's An Occurence on Owl Creek Bridge. He's strung up to a railroad bridge to be hanged by the Union soldiers, but his rope breaks and he pulls of a miraculous escape, only to have his escape end with him still on So I think Manny and Beth-Ann have it spot on. Peter Rabbit dies in this book, and his escape is a moment-of-death fantasy. Peter is the Peyton Farquhar of kids books. Farquhar, for those who don't remember, is the Alabama Confederate (gentleman farmer / non-combatant) from Ambrose Bierce's An Occurence on Owl Creek Bridge. He's strung up to a railroad bridge to be hanged by the Union soldiers, but his rope breaks and he pulls of a miraculous escape, only to have his escape end with him still on the rope as he chokes to death. Well, little Peter doesn't have Union soldiers to string him up, but he has old Mr. McGregor to chase him around the garden, and in Peter's attempt to escape he dives into a watering can -- and I say he drowns. How's that for a cautionary tale? I figure that Peter's death in the watering can is also a euphemism for rabbit stew, and Peter becomes a yummy dinner for Mr. and Mrs. McGregor. Lucky farmers that they are. But Peter, at least, is able to enjoy a moment-of-death fantasy where he goes home and declares to Mother Rabbit that he's learned his lesson. But even at home, even in his fantasy, death begins to close in, and while his siblings play and the smells of cooking rise up to greet him (Mrs. McGregor's kitchen as she skins his corpse, perhaps?), Peter ends his day (and his life) wrapped in the blankets of his little bed. Shivering from the cold he caught in the Mr. McGregor's water bottle. Death comes to us all, little bunny, especially when we ignore our parents! Remember that. Culinarily, I think I need to get my own little rabbit for a stew. It's been a while, and rabbit is de-lish.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kira Simion

    When I was about 5, my mother bought me a tea set with this story on it. Each cup and tiny plate and teapot had a line of this book on it. I only have two teacups and the teapot left.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Katy

    A lovely story and wonderful illustrations.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Abrar Alarjan

    تتكلم عن الأرنب بيتر الذي عصى أمه فذهب إلى الحقل الذي قتل فيه أبوه وجرت له مصائب وهو هناك ولكنه بعد ذلك قد نجى ومرض . كنت اود معرفة السبب الذي دفع بيتر غير الفضول الغير محمود ولكنهها قصة قصيرة غلب عليها السرد أكثر من أي شيء آخر .الجدير بالذكر بأن شركة نيكلودين قامت بتحويل إليه كرتون ،وأخمن بأن الدبلجة العربية قامت بدبلجته لكن لا اعرف اسمه في الدبلجة

  17. 4 out of 5

    Christy

    The farmer Mr. McGregor almost got the better of poor Peter Rabbit. He had quite the adventure, including munching on veggies and running from a man whose wife might have made him into pie if he caught the rabbit! Oh the horror! I like a few of the other Beatrix Potter books more but this one is still a sweet read. Great illustrations too.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Erin *Proud Book Hoarder*

    I used to read this one often. The charming British touch kept it fascinating, Peter Rabbit was adorable, there was tension and suspense, a moral message, and an awesome ending. Perfect for children and hard to forget.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    This is a nice and short story about a little rabbit, who unlike his brothers, disobeys his mom's orders and ends up having an adventure with a lot of troubles. Maybe from now on he'll listen to his mom a little bit more.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Worrell ツ

    Another favorite of my children.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    Several years ago my mother gave my stepdaughter a box set of all the Beatrix Potter books. We never read all of them but did read a good portion of them. At my sister's baby shower I gave her those books (plus a bunch more of my stepdaughter's baby books). Little did I know but at that time I was also pregnant (I would have kept a few of those books for my son had I known). But you can't change the past and I certainly wasn't ever going to ask for them back. So I had to search out a new copy fo Several years ago my mother gave my stepdaughter a box set of all the Beatrix Potter books. We never read all of them but did read a good portion of them. At my sister's baby shower I gave her those books (plus a bunch more of my stepdaughter's baby books). Little did I know but at that time I was also pregnant (I would have kept a few of those books for my son had I known). But you can't change the past and I certainly wasn't ever going to ask for them back. So I had to search out a new copy for my son. Unlike his sisters Peter Rabbit is a naughty little bunny who doesn't listen to his mother. She tells him to keep out of Mr. McGregor's garden. Peter, after eating too much, ends up with a belly ache. In search of some parsley he is seen by Mr. McGregor and is soon on the run from him and lost in the garden.  Peter Rabbit is so iconic. There are some literary figures that you can just mention by name and people immediately know what you are talking about. Our little rabbit is one of them. The illustrations are beyond charming and have that nostalgic feeling that draws you in. The theme is mature I wouldn't say it is something that children can't handle. After all children all over the world have been reading these books for well over 100 years.  4 out of 5 stars!

  22. 5 out of 5

    N.N. Light

    One of my favorite children's books of all time. I loved the sweet story of Peter Rabbit and the horrid Mr. McGregor. The illustrations are gorgeous and I highly recommend! My Rating: 5 stars

  23. 5 out of 5

    Shoa Khan

  24. 4 out of 5

    Manny

    Some people like to find creative readings of books and films which hinge on interpreting key parts as dream sequences. A well-known example is The Piano, where it's reasonable to argue that Ada actually drowns. On this reading, the last few minutes are her dying fantasies as she floats deep underwater, helplessly trapped by the weight of the piano. The last thing you see is indeed her drowned body twisting in the current, and it's not clear which is dream and which is reality. Beth Ann and I wer Some people like to find creative readings of books and films which hinge on interpreting key parts as dream sequences. A well-known example is The Piano, where it's reasonable to argue that Ada actually drowns. On this reading, the last few minutes are her dying fantasies as she floats deep underwater, helplessly trapped by the weight of the piano. The last thing you see is indeed her drowned body twisting in the current, and it's not clear which is dream and which is reality. Beth Ann and I were discussing today how far the above style of analysis could be taken. This book is a fine candidate. The normal reading has Peter escaping and running home without his shoes or jacket. However, there is perhaps a non-standard reading, where he is really caught by Mr McGregor, and the second half of the book consists of his hallucinations as he's having his neck wrung prior to being skinned and made into a pie. We apologize to any Beatrix Potter fans who may find this distasteful, but you are told at the beginning that that's what happened to Peter's father. Foreshadowing, you understand. We haven't found any smoking-gun clues, but then we didn't spend much time looking. With a little luck, there's a scholarly article waiting to be written here... please mention us if you do that!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Shirley Revill

    If you have children then I don't think you can go far wrong with these wonderful books by Beatrix Potter. A firm favourite on my bookshelf. Recommended.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sheila Majczan

    I bought and read all of Ms. Potter's books to my children...created small to fit tiny hands. Lovely stories incorporating the animals who live among us. I consider these as a necessary part of childhood.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Saga Norén

    I'm excited for the new movie, with Domhnall Gleeson and Rose Byrne.🐰🐇

  28. 4 out of 5

    Noura Khalid (theperksofbeingnoura)

    Peter Rabbit was one of my favorite childhood books. I got super excited when they decided to make it into a movie this year. I also decided to re-read it for memories sake and I just had to give it 5 stars! I found some pictures from the book online and decided to share them here. Whats better than your favorite childhood book in GIF form? || Blog || Instagram ||

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jack Kirby and the X-man

    A true classic. I don't recall reading Beatrix Potter as a child - but of course you seem to absorb the stories seemingly through societial osmosis. I certainly look forward to reading the rest of the Peter Rabbit books. I note with interest in the inside cover that this book has been translated into Latin, which I suppose would be useful if we had a time machine! Leaving behind the book itself you have to tip your cap at whoever does Beatrix Potter's tie-ins. Without even realising it I was readin A true classic. I don't recall reading Beatrix Potter as a child - but of course you seem to absorb the stories seemingly through societial osmosis. I certainly look forward to reading the rest of the Peter Rabbit books. I note with interest in the inside cover that this book has been translated into Latin, which I suppose would be useful if we had a time machine! Leaving behind the book itself you have to tip your cap at whoever does Beatrix Potter's tie-ins. Without even realising it I was reading "The Tale of Peter Rabbit" to X-man while he was wearing a Peter Rabbit T-shirt (really the only thing that relates the T-shirt to the books is a discrete logo on the sleve). We were being overlooked throughout the reading by a "Mrs Rabbit" photo frame. I was about to get on my high-horse about feeding X-man with a Bunnykins bowl and spoon too - but a quick bit of research reveils that Bunnykins was actually created independently by Sister Mary Barbara Bailey - so that put me in my place! (although you have to admit they both feature rabbits - both "naked" and clothed to entertain children, so you can understand the confusion).

  30. 5 out of 5

    Prashant

    In this book Peter Rabbit, one among the 4 kids decides to go on an adventure. He defies his mother to go to a old man's garden and create a fuss after he learns that his father met a sad end when he was there. This is a short story with lots of illustrations but two very strong messages. One which quickly grasped by all is 'you defy your mother and you will end up feeling tired in the end and all your brothers who obeyed her will get to eat the dinner she cooked.' But when I finished the book I In this book Peter Rabbit, one among the 4 kids decides to go on an adventure. He defies his mother to go to a old man's garden and create a fuss after he learns that his father met a sad end when he was there. This is a short story with lots of illustrations but two very strong messages. One which quickly grasped by all is 'you defy your mother and you will end up feeling tired in the end and all your brothers who obeyed her will get to eat the dinner she cooked.' But when I finished the book I got a little confused. The message that I got was a tad different one. I thought 'he defied his mother, had a feast in the garden, had to run for his life and had to find a way to get out thus got a survival lesson. Reached home all tired and sleepy and had dreams about what valiant effort he has put.' Now everything that I said here was not given in the book but that's what is lovely about children books. They leave a lot to your imagination to fantasize and build. Both the lessons are equally good to me and mine may be the figment of my mischievous mind. But who can judge?

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