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The Depression Book: Depression as an Opportunity for Spiritual Growth PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: The Depression Book: Depression as an Opportunity for Spiritual Growth
Author: Cheri Huber
Publisher: Published September 1st 2004 by Keep It Simple Books (first published 1990)
ISBN: 9780963625564
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

30704.The_Depression_Book.pdf

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This Zen guide to utilizing depression as an opportunity for spiritual growth and personal acceptance includes personal accounts, written excercises, and meditation instructions.

30 review for The Depression Book: Depression as an Opportunity for Spiritual Growth

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tonya

    I love this book I suffer from depression and this book has done for me what the Zoloft could not do: understand my depression

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Once I'd got over my dislike of the cover (a more depressing book visually I cannot imagine), my problem with the handwriting and drawings (I kept thinking 'couldn't they have chosen a prettier script and better illustrations?' before I realised that this reaction was exactly the sort of perfectionism that results in anxiety/depression), I gained many really useful insights from this book. Take this: 'If your hair were on fire, it would not be helpful to panic and race around in all directions a Once I'd got over my dislike of the cover (a more depressing book visually I cannot imagine), my problem with the handwriting and drawings (I kept thinking 'couldn't they have chosen a prettier script and better illustrations?' before I realised that this reaction was exactly the sort of perfectionism that results in anxiety/depression), I gained many really useful insights from this book. Take this: 'If your hair were on fire, it would not be helpful to panic and race around in all directions at once... Nor would it be a good idea to take a nap... What would be helpful? Get present, assess the situation, then move as quickly as possible to the nearest source of help. And I would encourage you to pull out all the stops. Staying with our hair-on-fire analogy, dunk your head underwaterwater, grab a fire extinguisher, smother the flames, yell for help. In other words, see your physician, see a therapist, start an awareness practice, learn to meditate.' Given when I'm down I can veer from mania to duvet diving, this struck a nerve, and there was more, too. Interestingly, it shares a lot of the reasoning I found in 'Sunbathing in the Rain' by Gwyneth Lewis. Personally - and this is subjective - I preferred Sunbathing, as I loved Lewis' writing and the author's life experiences resonated strongly with my own. I also liked 'Shoot the Damn Dog' by Sally Brampton. But I would, as indicated by the quote above, suggest one adds this to meds/therapy/other books when pulling out the stops to heal oneself. Especially as only takes an hour or two to read, if rather longer to put into practice.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Eli

    A lot of good ideas, but somewhat lacking in practical advice. OK, we're not supposed to resist depression, but how do we not resist it without wallowing in it and becoming slaves to it? Like a lot of introductory Zen texts, I always feel frustrated, like there's something not being said that I'm just supposed to intuitively know how to do, and I don't. Still, some throught-provoking ideas that I might find helpful. Will reread and reconsider.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Algernon

    Of all the people who say "I am depressed," there are some experiencing a clinical condition that is very serious, beyond the control of willpower, and can in fact spiral downward into life-threatening complications. A change of attitude and a little meditation is not a panacea for a psychiatric disorder. Others who refer to "depression" refer to a generalized category of soul-numbing patterns of thought that suppress feelings and flatten one's inspiration, and it may feel out of control to one Of all the people who say "I am depressed," there are some experiencing a clinical condition that is very serious, beyond the control of willpower, and can in fact spiral downward into life-threatening complications. A change of attitude and a little meditation is not a panacea for a psychiatric disorder. Others who refer to "depression" refer to a generalized category of soul-numbing patterns of thought that suppress feelings and flatten one's inspiration, and it may feel out of control to one who has given up. For the latter, Zen teacher Cheri Huber offers some suggestions for reframing one's experience of despair, fear, resistance, melancholy, existential fatigue - and turning it into a creative basis for awakening. The direction of the book is constructive and positive, and emphasizes simple, practical meditation as the basis for untying those knots which are tied by none other than ourselves. It is an important contribution to our attitudes about depression and encapsulates core Buddhist teaching with hardly a mention of the Buddha or Buddhism. It is also fun to read, often hilarious, sensible - and unsparing. One of the basic and essential works of this important modern guide.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Deborah

    I like it. It is written in a straigh forward and simple manner and gives you something to think about. I disagree with the fact that we just "depress" ourselves. Some peoples depression is caused by a chemical imblance in the brain and is due to a lack of serotonin. It is good to be aware of what causes you to feel depressed or a deep, deep sadness. Or even being aware of the emotions/symptoms that are caused by your depression. ie anxiety, sleeplessness, irratability, anger, fatigue etc. The more I like it. It is written in a straigh forward and simple manner and gives you something to think about. I disagree with the fact that we just "depress" ourselves. Some peoples depression is caused by a chemical imblance in the brain and is due to a lack of serotonin. It is good to be aware of what causes you to feel depressed or a deep, deep sadness. Or even being aware of the emotions/symptoms that are caused by your depression. ie anxiety, sleeplessness, irratability, anger, fatigue etc. The more familiar you become with your own personal experience of how you feel, the better able you are to work with improving the state of your mental health. Be good to yourself, eat well, get adequate sleep, some excercise ( short/long walks) and lots and lots of sunshine whenever possible. Its a good simple straight forward book to read and not challenging at all. Particularly if you are not up to reading or doing anything much. Take on board what relates to you and work with it. Small steps are the best. Then read it again and see what new insights you become aware of and go from there.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    An honest, non-coddling, supportive, caring suggestion on how to re-wire your brain to love yourself. When I was in an extremely good mood, this book seemed silly and unnecessary. When I was feeling truly down and worthless, I couldn't bear to look at this book. In the times I was ebbing in and out of my various moods, this book touched upon truths that I know deeply. The guiding words could be taken differently by one person on different days. To be "depressed" seems almost a cliche label these An honest, non-coddling, supportive, caring suggestion on how to re-wire your brain to love yourself. When I was in an extremely good mood, this book seemed silly and unnecessary. When I was feeling truly down and worthless, I couldn't bear to look at this book. In the times I was ebbing in and out of my various moods, this book touched upon truths that I know deeply. The guiding words could be taken differently by one person on different days. To be "depressed" seems almost a cliche label these days, but many people feel a little negative now and then. I find myself reflecting on the writer's words often.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kylie

    Not really sure what to make of this book. It might be a really good read for someone who struggles with depression that is caused by stress or life-struggles. However, as someone with Bipolar II, who has spent over a decade studying meditation and centering techniques in an attempt to alleviate the depression that comes with my mental illness, I found the constant reiteration that finding the CAUSE of the depression will allow you to move past it almost insulting. The cause of my depression is Not really sure what to make of this book. It might be a really good read for someone who struggles with depression that is caused by stress or life-struggles. However, as someone with Bipolar II, who has spent over a decade studying meditation and centering techniques in an attempt to alleviate the depression that comes with my mental illness, I found the constant reiteration that finding the CAUSE of the depression will allow you to move past it almost insulting. The cause of my depression is an imbalance in the neurotransmitters in my brain. I've known that for several years - hasn't stopped the depression or even shortened cycles. However, for those who have depression as a reaction to an external stressor, it's not bad advice.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

    Read this in the middle of a pretty hefty depression spiral. And it did quite a good job, not of pulling me out of it, but pulling me more deeply into it, letting myself actually listen to what it was telling me and productively work through a complex pile of emotions and experiences I hadn't let myself look at directly. It's unabashedly spiritual, and frankly better for it. Mindfulness isn't a panacea and depression is a serious, treatable disease, but I at least found this approach helpful and Read this in the middle of a pretty hefty depression spiral. And it did quite a good job, not of pulling me out of it, but pulling me more deeply into it, letting myself actually listen to what it was telling me and productively work through a complex pile of emotions and experiences I hadn't let myself look at directly. It's unabashedly spiritual, and frankly better for it. Mindfulness isn't a panacea and depression is a serious, treatable disease, but I at least found this approach helpful and rewarding

  9. 4 out of 5

    Michael Sypes

    Generally good, but with such a reliance on metaphors, it's hard to figure out what she's really talking about sometimes. On the practical side there are a couple of really good meditation exercises in here.

  10. 4 out of 5

    K.Q. Webster

    A fresh look at depression suggesting that it may be a blessing in disguise. A chance to learn about and come to love yourself more. That it may be easier than you think to let that darkness subside. It's not the end all and doesn't replace professional help but it shows you a path that could help you become more at peace with your circumstances.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Holly

    This Zen/mindfulness perspective has significantly altered my own perspective on coping with depression, for the better, I think. Her approach to depression and other negative emotional experiences is unconventional but empowering, and pretty darn functional. If you deal with depression or anxiety, I highly recommend this. It's not much of a time commitment, either.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    Handwritten to help you read it a little differently - perhaps a little slower. This book hit me at a wonderful time, and has given me language and understanding to use in accepting my experiences and those of others. I imagine that it could be a book that could spiral around, with added potential each time. I recommend it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Fishface

    Now this is a really interesting, oddly empowering book on depression, placing it in the context of a person's spiritual state and making recommendations on that basis. Very easy to read. This one cheerfully flies in the face of medical-model "you've got a chemical imbalance" nonsense.

  14. 5 out of 5

    J Crossley

    In The Depression Book, Cheri Huber suggests that rather than look at depression as something to get "over," looking at depression as a spiritual tool. Perhaps by looking inward and seeing what we really need we can move through depression quicker.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    This was really the first book about Depression to ever boil down soul-crushing despair into a form I could work with. I really cannot recommend this book highly enough.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Emily

    Wonderful companion for those who battle depression or struggle with self esteem.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    It made me believe that I am capable of coping with my periodic depression without going on meds - and that's a good thing -

  18. 5 out of 5

    John F Herberger

    I recommend this book more than any other to friends and family. I am thankful to my friend Sally who recommended it to me back in the early 90's. If it calls to you - read it

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    This book changed & saved my life. It's name has since changed to "Being Present In Darkness", which I reccommend to everyone.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Peggy

    I love this author, and her style of writing. I suffer from depression and it really helped

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn J

    A book that should be on ever shelf !!!!! Gentle and Real!!!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jenn

    A refreshing approach to dealing with depressing times. Highly recommend it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Enthony

    Everything.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ariane

    Oops, finished this a while back. Good, but "There is nothing wrong with you" is still my favourite. ;)

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tarin

    helpful tips

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jeane Watier

    This really helped me understand depression, see it in a new way and ultimately overcome it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    Not liking this one as much as some of the others I've read, but it's got enough in it to give it a read once...

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nicki O'neill

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kristen Wold

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tblist

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