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Salad Bar Beef PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: Salad Bar Beef
Author: Joel Salatin
Publisher: Published July 1st 1996 by Polyface
ISBN: 9780963810915
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

683037.Salad_Bar_Beef.pdf

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In a day when beef is assailed by many environmental organizations and lauded by fast-food chains, a new paradigm to bring reason to this confusion is in order. With farmers leaving the land in droves and plows poised to "reclaim" set-aside acres, it is time to offer an alternative that is both land and farmer friendly. Beyond that, the salad bar beef production model offer In a day when beef is assailed by many environmental organizations and lauded by fast-food chains, a new paradigm to bring reason to this confusion is in order. With farmers leaving the land in droves and plows poised to "reclaim" set-aside acres, it is time to offer an alternative that is both land and farmer friendly. Beyond that, the salad bar beef production model offers hope to rural communities, to struggling row-crop farmers, and to frustrated beef eaters who do not want to encourage desertification, air and water pollution, environmental degradation and inhumane animal treatment. Because this is a program weighted toward creativity, management, entrepreneurism and observation, it breathes fresh air into farm economics.

30 review for Salad Bar Beef

  1. 4 out of 5

    Wayne

    I have mixed feelings as I sit down to write this. See, Joel Salatin is something of a hero of mine. A little over two years ago, I found myself trying to get by on odd jobs and feeling like the only path to a life of farming was to land a salaried position somewhere that would pay enough for me to get a mortgage to pay the $100K-$500K necessary to get a farm. As there seemed little hope of that happening, I was feeling pretty defeated. Then I read Joel's book, "You Can Farm," which told me I wa I have mixed feelings as I sit down to write this. See, Joel Salatin is something of a hero of mine. A little over two years ago, I found myself trying to get by on odd jobs and feeling like the only path to a life of farming was to land a salaried position somewhere that would pay enough for me to get a mortgage to pay the $100K-$500K necessary to get a farm. As there seemed little hope of that happening, I was feeling pretty defeated. Then I read Joel's book, "You Can Farm," which told me I was going about it entirely the wrong way. He, like other authors, said not to buy a farm unless you can pay cash for it and have enough money saved up to live on for a year. I didn't want to hear that, as it just put my dream further out of reach. BUT...he went on to say that buying land wasn't necessary for farming. Buying land, he stressed, was a wealth preservation strategy--somewhere to invest your amassed wealth so that it didn't lose value--while farming rented land was a wealth acquisition strategy. I had been thinking that if I was paying rent for land, that would eat up any money I'd make farming it. But that happens with a mortgage, too. Paying rent on a small parcel puts it more within reach. Acting on that advice, I found a friend in the country who rented me her large yard/former cow pasture to use as a vegetable garden while I raise chickens in my own backyard. It was too far away for me to give the garden the attention it needed and my tiller wouldn't work, so the garden was a flop...but it got me started. I had gotten my licenses and rented a spot at a farmers market, and I was selling frozen chicken, as well as some occasional tomatoes. From there, I started looking for other parcels closer to home. The next year (last year), I started a vegetable CSA. Only five members, but it's progress. Also last year, my wife and I bought land--almost five acres and a (run down) 4br, 2bath house for $25K...just two blocks from where we live now. This year, I've been gardening on someone else's land while improving our own. The wheels have been set in motion, all because Joel Salatin pointed me toward an alternative entry point. Earlier this year, I was invited to speak at the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association's annual convention where Joel Salatin was one of the keynote speakers. I got to thank him in person. I disagree with him considerably on issues of religion and politics, but I like the man, and I owed him a debt of gratitude. In "You Can Farm," he made reference to this book, "Salad Bar Beef," and said that it laid out how a person who had nothing could start raising cattle. This excited me, and based on my success getting started farming without owning a farm, I believed him. I looked for this book at the library, but they didn't carry it. I finally bought it, and indeed, it repeats the claim right there in the beginning of the book--"You can start raising cattle with nothing other than some fencing and a pair of walking shoes," (or something to that effect). He says it at least twice, I think once in the intro and once in the first chapter, like a Sham-Wow salesman trying to build up the anticipation. He has a detailed plan that will enable a person who has nothing but shoes and a roll of fence to start raising cattle. Oh, and a water tank. Okay, no problem. That's just a few hundred dollars at most. Cattle sell for thousands. He's going to tell us how to turn our roll of fence wire, pair of shoes, and a water tank into money from selling our own grass-fed beef. Oh boy! Then he gets into a chapter on water. I found this to be an incredibly useful chapter, as I'm developing irrigation systems for my gardens and would like to turn the catch basin on my property into a pond, and a lot of his information is relevant. But it's also expensive. At one point in the chapter, after describing a few different options for pumping water out to your cows' water tank, he says that however you do it, it's going to cost some money. Well, damn, Joel. You seem to have forgotten that part back when you were making your claims about fence wire and walking shoes. The hundreds to thousands of dollars for pipes, fittings, a pump, and a power supply all just sort of slipped your mind when you were making the claims that incited me to lay out twenty-some dollars for the book. I'm still gullible enough to be waiting to see how I obtain pasture, cattle, and a stock trailer, all without paying for them. That said, I'm already getting a lot out of this book. So far--and I'm skipping through it, as the first couple chapters seem to be a sales pitch on why you ought to want to raise grass-fed beef and sell it directly to end consumers (if I wasn't already sold on that, why would I have bought the book?)--it seems to be more about the ecology of pasture than it is about cows. He says that there are three basic types of habitats: open land, forests, and water. While some species prefer just one of these, most (terrestrial) species, he says, prefer two. He points out that a lot of the birds they rely on for insect control in their pastures will not feed more than 200 yards away from forest. This is the real reason he considers forests to be a necessary part of a farm. It's not just the free fence posts and wood chips. Furthermore, as he goes on about these necessary species that live on the edges of forest and open land, he says that they're good for gardens as well as pastures. Well, shoot. This land we bought is mostly wooded, and being a lover of forests, I've been loathe to cut down any trees. But it's SO forested that I have little room to grow anything (other than maybe mushrooms and ginseng) and I have to keep relying on other people to let me use their yards for gardening. This is silly, to buy five acres and then have to use somebody else's land...but I didn't want to destroy any forest. There's a sort-of-open part that I had decided to open up completely for a garden, but I still felt bad about it. Now here comes Joel Salatin telling me it will actually do the wildlife some good to have a clearing in the woods. The garden will still be surrounded by forests, but apparently, by cutting down trees where there's already some grass growing, I'll attract new species, some of which will be helpful. Last night, I started cutting down trees, stripping them of their bark so I can use them for a new perch for my hens. In all likelihood, I won't be raising cattle anytime in the near future, but I still think I'm going to get a lot out of this book...even if it's not what the author was promising.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

    Another book about farming that focuses on the cleanest and most humane way to raise cattle. This guy tends to rant a bit about how our system is so messed up and unsustainable. His book reads like a how-to guide for someone looking to raise cattle however he is really choppy in getting his points across due to his random tangents. His methods are fascinating and extremely efficient with regards to cost and labor. I really like the concepts presented in the book but his utopian value system seem Another book about farming that focuses on the cleanest and most humane way to raise cattle. This guy tends to rant a bit about how our system is so messed up and unsustainable. His book reads like a how-to guide for someone looking to raise cattle however he is really choppy in getting his points across due to his random tangents. His methods are fascinating and extremely efficient with regards to cost and labor. I really like the concepts presented in the book but his utopian value system seems to condemn a few things that have made living in this country special.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Claudia Yahany

    Igual que el anterior, este libro necesita actualizarse 22 aƱos. Lo bueno, es un esquema completamente diferente, probado y que continua funcionando. Lo malo, no me encanta la personalidad poquito anarquista. Primero es el pasto, luego los rumiantes y al final las aves. Go figure.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Loved it, especially the sarcastic comments throughout, humour is a winner. Makes sense, implementing his ideas into our farm currently.

  5. 5 out of 5

    John

    This is now the third book by Joel Salatin of Polyface Farm in Virginia that I have read, and it has very much shaped my ideas about what is possible for agriculture going forward into the future. From his other books (particularly You Can Farm), I already had the basic idea of his model for raising grass-fed beef, but this book fleshed out the concepts and practices that he uses to raise what he hopes is the best beef inthe world. From the title, you may have noticed that Salatin doesn't call it This is now the third book by Joel Salatin of Polyface Farm in Virginia that I have read, and it has very much shaped my ideas about what is possible for agriculture going forward into the future. From his other books (particularly You Can Farm), I already had the basic idea of his model for raising grass-fed beef, but this book fleshed out the concepts and practices that he uses to raise what he hopes is the best beef inthe world. From the title, you may have noticed that Salatin doesn't call it grass-fed but, instead, "Salad Bar" beef. He talks about this from a marketing standpoint, but it's also a term that's more accurate for what he's doing. Central to his project is a model for animal husbandry that listens to the animals, that gives them in many ways a salad bar of options (though grains such as the corn that conventional beef is raised on is not one of those options). It's husbandry that pays close attention to the animals and to the land, treating each with almost a reverance that is at odds with industrial production models. Research, both that which Salatin cites and that which I've read elsewhere, suggests that cattle raised the way Salatin describes (and other similar grass-fed models) offer many benefits, from food quality to better land management to a better livelihood for the farmer. As with his other books, there is a section on marketing, as Salatin advotes direct relationships between the farmer and the customer, cutting out the middlemen both to better profit the farmer and to build greater understanding in both directions between farmer and customer. This material is only slightly changed from what is included in his other books. At times, I wish for greater specificity, especially as someone with only a minimal farming background. Still, this is an excellent practical guide to excellent practices in raising herd animals (many of the principle also apply to sheep).

  6. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    I added this to my to-read list while I was still reading The Omnivore's Dilemma. The book is really not intended for a non-farmer audience, I think- you're supposed to read the book and then starting working on your own notebook of ideas to apply to your own farm. Author Salatin is lovably whacked, oscillating between cool-headed farmer/business owner and irascible, Christian-informed, activist, all the while staying on-topic and organized. (And you know I wouldn't describe someone as lovably w I added this to my to-read list while I was still reading The Omnivore's Dilemma. The book is really not intended for a non-farmer audience, I think- you're supposed to read the book and then starting working on your own notebook of ideas to apply to your own farm. Author Salatin is lovably whacked, oscillating between cool-headed farmer/business owner and irascible, Christian-informed, activist, all the while staying on-topic and organized. (And you know I wouldn't describe someone as lovably whacked unless they actually were.) Other things I liked about the book: complete lack of irony, complete lack of condescension to the audience as such, and the author's insistence that one out forth the effort to determine a method that works well rather than relying on a pattern book for easy answers. Definitely the most engaging non-fiction to hit my shelf in months.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Titus

    Highly motivating, full of step by step how to details with just the right amount of enthusiasm thrown in so you want to do it. I plan on following these techniques to the best of my ability. Books like The Omnivore's Delema only describe a problem; Salad Bar Beef offers a solution, and more than that, it tells you how to be a part of that solution! I will keep my eyes open for more books like this one!!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    Another hit from Mr Salatin. I am gonna go buy some land and some cows and feed them grass!!! So far my favorite book from Joel Salatin. Not too much detail but simple clear instructions on how to do it yourself with plenty of reference for further reading with more detail. I'm actually on my way tomorrow to go to the farm for the annual field day!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Brad Belschner

    Decent book, full of practical tips for a small beef operation. Probably worth reading for anyone wanting to do that. Most important random fact I learned: making hay in circular bales is stupid, because the hay molds!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    I've been wanting to read this book for awhile. Who would have thought that it would actually be enjoyable. Some of the info/lingo is over my head, but most is easy to understand. Makes me excited to raise my own cows!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    More people need to read this book. It explains where your food comes from and how it's produced. It explains how farmers can have a better product and gain a better profit from it while helping the environment.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Audrey

    Fabulous true story of a farmer who uses very innovative farming techniques to make sure his animals are healthy (and better for us to eat). His land is a functioning, replenishing organic ecosystem.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Susan Smith

    Interesting to see how small farm beef is raised and slaughtered compared to the way big business does it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    I love, Love, LOVE Joel Salatin's approach to good stewardship over the land. He lays out the ways to implement management intesive grazing in such an easy-to-read format!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Trisha

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ian Sarah

  17. 4 out of 5

    David & Beth

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jim

  19. 4 out of 5

    Audrey

  20. 5 out of 5

    Robin Scearce

  21. 5 out of 5

    Todd

  22. 5 out of 5

    Doug Ray

  23. 5 out of 5

    Remy

  24. 4 out of 5

    Chad Warden

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nikki

  26. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

  27. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

  28. 4 out of 5

    Avril Whitton

  29. 4 out of 5

    Andres Kirejew

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ian

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